Religion and Politics in East Asia




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REL 599: Religion and Politics in East Asia

To be cross-listed with IR as part of the RIGG Program

Instructor: Lori Meeks (Religion and EALC)

Spring 2010

Wednesdays, 2:00-4:50 pm

Location TBA


Course Goals


Content

  • To understand how religious ideas, practices, and communities influence political discourse in contemporary East Asia.

  • To examine church-state relations in East Asia.

  • To examine the role that religion plays in the shaping of national (and in some cases, nationalist) identities in the region.

  • To explore how religious ideas and institutions shape economic and social discourse in East Asia. To what degree do business models in East Asia reflect values found in the region’s religious traditions? How do religious values in the region shape public views of major social issues?

  • To study the roles that religious NGOs play in the region.

  • To probe how religious ideas and practices in the region affect public attitudes towards the West, and towards the United States in particular.


Professional Development

  • To learn how the perspectives of Religious Studies might be fruitfully applied to research on Politics and International Relations in East Asia.

  • To produce article-length research paper that explores some aspect of the relationship between religion and public discourse in the East Asian region.

  • To hone oral presentation skills.



Assignments and Grade Allocations


Weekly response papers

(2 pp., double-spaced, to be posted on course wiki) 25%

Participation (includes opening or leading discussion for the

seminar meeting to which you are assigned) 10%

Annotated Research Bibliography (due March 10, 2010) 15%

Final Research Presentation (20 min.) 10%

Final Research Paper (due Monday, May 10, 2010, 5:00 pm) 40%


Books


The following six books are available for purchase at the University Bookstore and have also been placed on Reserves at Leavey Library. Additional readings (journal articles and book chapters) have been posted as pdfs on our course wiki. You will be responsible for printing out those readings and bringing them to class.


Daniel A. Bell and Hahm Chaibong, eds., Confucianism for the Modern World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003).

John Breen, Yasukuni, the War Dead and the Struggle for Japan's Past (New York: Columbia University Press, 2008).

Dru Gladney, Dislocating China: Muslims, Minorities, and Other Subaltern Subjects (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004).

C. Julia Huang, Charisma and Compassion: Cheng Yen and the Buddhist Tzu Chi Movement (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009).

Christopher Ives, Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen's Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics (Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2009).

Warren W. Smith, Jr., China’s Tibet?: Autonomy or Assimilation (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008).


Class Schedule


Week One: Jan. 13, 2010

Does Religious Studies offer a unique perspective on international political life?


  • Jeffrey Haynes, “Religion, Soft Power and International Relations,” from An Introduction to International Relations and Religion (Longman, 2007), pp. 31-62, posted on course wiki.

  • Jonathan Fox and Shmuel Sandler, “Toward a Theory of International Relations and Religion,” from Bringing Religion Into International Relations (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006), pp. 163-80, posted on course wiki (book also available online through the USC Library system: https://libproxy.usc.edu/login?url=http://site.ebrary.com/lib/uscisd/Doc?id=10135540).

  • Selections from John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge, God Is Back: How the Global Revival of Faith is Changing the World (New York: Penguin Press, 2009), posted on course wiki.



Week Two: Jan. 20, 2010

Religion and Politics in East Asia: An Overview


  • Thomas DuBois, “Imperialism, Hegemony and the Construction of Religion in East and Southeast Asia,” History & Theory, Vol. 44 (4), Theorizing Empire theme issue, December 2005, 113-31, posted on course wiki.

  • Eric O. Hanson, “East Asia: Modernization and Ideology,” from Religion and Politics in the International System Today (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), pp. 164-97, posted on course wiki.

  • Todd Lewis, “Buddhism: Ways to Nirvana,” in John L. Esposito, Darrell J. Fasching, and Todd Lewis, Religion and Globalization: World Religions in Historical Perspective (Oxford University Press, 2007), posted on course wiki.

  • Todd Lewis, “East Asian Religions: Traditions of Human Cultivation and Natural Harmony,” in John L. Esposito, Darrell J. Fasching, and Todd Lewis, Religion and Globalization: World Religions in Historical Perspective (Oxford University Press, 2007), posted on course wiki.



Week Three: Jan. 27. 2010

Religion and Identity


  • Mark Juergensmeyer, “The New Religious State,” Comparative Politics 27.4 (1995): 379-91, posted on course wiki.

  • Prasenjit Duara, “The Discourse of Civilization and Pan-Asianism,” Journal of World History 12.1 (2001): 99-130, posted on course wiki.

  • Jonathan M. Reynolds, “Ise Shrine and a Modernist Construction of Japanese Tradition,” Art Bulletin 83.2 (2001): 316-41, posted on course wiki.

  • Masayuki Ito, “The Status of the Individual in Japanese Religions: Implications for Japan’s Collectivistic Social Values,” Social Compass 45.4 (1998): 619-33, posted on course wiki.

  • Jin Young Park, “Religious Conflict or Religious Anxiety: New Buddhist Movements in Korea and Japan,” Religious Studies and Theology 17.2 (1998): 34-46, posted on course wiki.



Week Four: February 3, 2010

Religion and the State


  • Selections from Yoshiko Ashiwa and David Wank, eds., Making Religion, Making the State: The Politics of Religion in Modern China (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009), posted on course wiki.

  • Selections from Mayfair Mei-hui Yang, Chinese Religiosities: Afflictions of Modernity and State Formation (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008), posted on course wiki.

  • Selections from Yang Fenggang,ed., State, Market, and Religions in Chinese Society (Brill, 2005), available online through the USC Libraries System (https://libproxy.usc.edu/login?url=http://site.ebrary.com/lib/uscisd/Doc?id=10171703)

  • Dae Young Ryu, “Religion, Politics, and Church Construction in North Korea,” Theology Today 63 (2007): 493-99, posted on course wiki.



Week Five: February 10, 2010

Confucian Values in Public Discourse


  • Daniel A. Bell and Hahm Chaibong, eds., Confucianism for the Modern World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003).

  • Tom Ginsberg, “Confucian Constitutionalism?: The Emergence of Constitutional Review in Korea and Taiwan,” Law and Social Inquiry 27.4 (2002), pp. 763-99, posted on course wiki.



Week Six: February 17, 2010

Islamic China


  • Dru Gladney, Dislocating China: Muslims, Minorities, and Other Subaltern Subjects (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004).



Week Seven: February 24, 2010

Tibet


  • Warren W. Smith, Jr., China’s Tibet?: Autonomy or Assimilation (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008).



Week Eight: March 3, 2010

Japanese Buddhism’s Wartime Legacy


  • Christopher Ives, Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen's Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics (Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2009).




March 15-20: Spring Recess



Week Nine: March 10, 2010

Controversies Surrounding the Veneration of the War Dead in Japan


  • John Breen, Yasukuni, the War Dead and the Struggle for Japan's Past (New York: Columbia University Press, 2008).

Annotated Bibliography (for final research project) DUE IN CLASS today.



Week Ten: March 24, 2010

Buddhist NGOs


  • C. Julia Huang, Charisma and Compassion: Cheng Yen and the Buddhist Tzu Chi Movement (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009).



Week Eleven: March 31, 2010

Christianity in East Asia


  • Selections from Chung-shin Park, Protestantism and Politics in Korea (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2009), posted on course wiki.

  • Kang-Nam Oh, “The Christian-Buddhist Encounter in Korea,” Robert Buswell and Timothy Lee, eds., Christianity in Korea (Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2007), pp. 371-86, posted on course wiki.

  • Andrew E. Kim, “Protestantism in Korea and Japan from the 1880s to the 1940s: A comparative study of differential cultural reception and social impact,” Korea Journal 45.4 (2005): 261-90, posted on course wiki.

  • Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, “Christianity in Contemporary China: An Update,” Journal of Church and State 49.2 (2007): 277-304, posted on course wiki.




We will devote our last four meetings to student research presentations. Each presenter will be asked to assign one article or chapter for the class to read in advance of his or her presentation. Presenters should also post, at least three days prior to their in-class presentations, an abstract of their research project.


Week Twelve: April 7, 2010

Student Research Presentations

(1) Read abstracts of scheduled research presentations on the course wiki.

(2) Complete reading assigned by students scheduled to present this week.

(3) Instead of a weekly reflection paper, you should prepare at least one question for each presenter. Post these questions on the course wiki in advance of our meeting.


Week Thirteen: April 14, 2010

Student Research Presentations

(1) Read abstracts of scheduled research presentations on the course wiki.

(2) Complete reading assigned by students scheduled to present this week.

(3) Instead of a weekly reflection paper, you should prepare at least one question for each presenter. Post these questions on the course wiki in advance of our meeting.


Week Fourteen: April 21, 2010

Student Research Presentations

(1) Read abstracts of scheduled research presentations on the course wiki.

(2) Complete reading assigned by students scheduled to present this week.

(3) Instead of a weekly reflection paper, you should prepare at least one question for each presenter. Post these questions on the course wiki in advance of our meeting.


Week Fifteen: April 28, 2010

Student Research Presentations and Wrap-up Discussion

(1) Read abstracts of scheduled research presentations on the course wiki.

(2) Complete reading assigned by students scheduled to present this week.

(3) Instead of a weekly reflection paper, you should prepare at least one question for each presenter. Post these questions on the course wiki in advance of our meeting.

(4) Before today’s meeting you should prepare the wrap-up discussion questions posted on the course wiki.


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