Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract




Скачать 388.29 Kb.
НазваниеRelated or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract
страница14/16
Дата29.10.2012
Размер388.29 Kb.
ТипДокументы
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16

Promoting human rights is useless or evil


There is no philosophical consensus on a core set of fundamental human rights

Eric A. Posner (Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law, University of Chicago), Human Welfare Not Human Rights: The University of Chicago Public Law and Legal Theory working paper series #207, March 2008. Available online through the Social Science Research Network Electronic Paper Collection: http://ssrn.com/abstract_id=1105209, accessed April 15, 2009. p. 4

“First, the proposition that all people enjoy a specified set of human rights — that is, rights grounded in universal moral principles that require governments to aid, protect, and refrain from abusing their own citizens — is highly controversial among philosophers. The absence of a philosophical justification for human rights yields well-known difficulties: that states disagree about which rights are human rights, about which human rights should have priority, about how resources should be allocated for the purpose of correcting human rights violations, and about how much respect should be given to cultural variation. In the absence of a principled basis for human rights, these disputes cannot even in principle be resolved.”


Philosophers no longer defend the position that human dignity creates human rights

Eric A. Posner (Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law, University of Chicago), Human Welfare Not Human Rights: The University of Chicago Public Law and Legal Theory working paper series #207, March 2008. Available online through the Social Science Research Network Electronic Paper Collection: http://ssrn.com/abstract_id=1105209, accessed April 15, 2009. p. 8

“Moral theories typically hold that individuals have inherent human rights, derivable from the basic postulate of equal human dignity. These rights are universal, held by all people by virtue of being human. Few philosophers seem willing to defend this position any more, though it is entrenched in the legal materials and rhetoric of human rights. The philosophical literature now focuses on contractarian and welfarist approaches.”


There is a tradeoff between human rights and aid to the needy

Eric A. Posner (Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law, University of Chicago), Human Welfare Not Human Rights: The University of Chicago Public Law and Legal Theory working paper series #207, March 2008. Available online through the Social Science Research Network Electronic Paper Collection: http://ssrn.com/abstract_id=1105209, accessed April 15, 2009. p. 4

“In contrast to the anemic efforts to enforce human rights treaties, developed states have contributed massive amounts of aid to the poorest nations. Aid to victims of natural disasters is commonplace. Development aid is more controversial but still largely unquestioned. The commitment to aiding people who live in the poorest states is in tension with a human rights regime that envisions isolating the worst governments, because the worst governments usually govern the poorest states.”


There is tension between opposing imperialism and promoting human rights

Richard Just (staff managing editor), “Evils and Excuses,” The New Republic, September 9, 2009, p. 28

“Mamdani’s book nicely exemplifies one pole in the old and ongoing struggle between two sometimes contradictory impulses of liberal foreign policy: the opposition to imperialism and the devotion to human rights. If liberals view anti-imperialism as their primary philosophical commitment, then they will be reluctant to meddle in the affairs of other countries, even when they are ruled by authoritarian governments — as in Sudan — that abuse their own people. But if liberalism’s primary commitment is to human rights, then liberals will be willing to judge, to oppose, and even to undermine such governments.”


The question of opposing imperialism versus promoting human rights remains unresolved

Richard Just (staff managing editor), “Evils and Excuses,” The New Republic, September 9, 2009, p. 28

“The military is simply one among many means that can be used to interfere in other countries (though it is certainly the bluntest). The more basic question — is it right to interfere? — is the one that needs to be asked before we talk about invasions or air strikes or sanctions or International Criminal Court indictments or any other means of impeding abusive leaders and promoting human rights. And when you put the question to people on the left — when you ask them whether it is morally and historically correct for liberals to be in the business of promoting liberalism by undermining illiberal governments — you get a wide range of responses, which suggest that the old contest between the anti-imperialist impulse and the human rights impulse is alive and well.”


Treaties do not improve human rights

Eric A. Posner (Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law, University of Chicago), Human Welfare Not Human Rights: The University of Chicago Public Law and Legal Theory working paper series #207, March 2008. Available online through the Social Science Research Network Electronic Paper Collection: http://ssrn.com/abstract_id=1105209, accessed April 15, 2009. p. 5

“Finally, recent empirical studies suggest that states that ratify human rights treaties do not improve their human rights performance, or, at least, that improvements are small and sporadic and hard to measure, perhaps limited only to certain types of states — democracies, for example. These studies are controversial, but they raise the question whether a different type of treaty regime would produce better outcomes.”


1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16

Похожие:

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconRelated or contrasting ideas may be found in the sections on Animal Rights, Knowledge, Life, Medical Ethics, Nature, Progress, and Science

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconRelated or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Absolutism, Consequentialism, Duty, Intuitionism, Needs, Nietzsche, Relativism, Subjectivism, and Values

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconBout 90 per cent of all Charter arguments raised in reported cases across all Canadian courts deal with one of the legal rights sections sections 7-14

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconNuclear Weapons and Nonproliferation”

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconClockwise from bottom left: Atoms for Peace, speech by Dwight D. Eisenhower; Saint-Laurent Nuclear Power Plant; Nuclear power plant; Mushroom cloud at Nevada

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconBomb Scare: The History & future of Nuclear Weapons

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract icon1. What is the difference between Employment Law and Contract Law?

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconLaw, Social Justice & Global Development (An Electronic Law Journal)

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconLaw, Social Justice & Global Development (An Electronic Law Journal)

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconLaw, Social Justice & Global Development (An Electronic Law Journal)

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница