Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract




Скачать 388.29 Kb.
НазваниеRelated or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract
страница13/16
Дата29.10.2012
Размер388.29 Kb.
ТипДокументы
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16

Promoting human rights is good


Nations take the concept of human rights seriously

Eric A. Posner (Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law, University of Chicago), Human Welfare Not Human Rights: The University of Chicago Public Law and Legal Theory working paper series #207, March 2008. Available online through the Social Science Research Network Electronic Paper Collection: http://ssrn.com/abstract_id=1105209, accessed April 15, 2009. p. 2-3

“The U.S. State Department annually publishes a list of nations that violate human rights. Many NGOs do the same. These lists identify states that torture dissidents, detain people without charging them, suppress religious minorities, and commit other abuses. The reports condemn violators of human rights and urge leading states to pressure human-rights abusers until they bring their conduct in line with international standards. Indeed, the United States imposes certain legal disabilities on human rights-abusing states, and the European Union makes ratification of the European Convention on Human Rights a condition of membership. International organizations like the World Bank encourage recipients of aid to improve their human rights records. And by ratifying human rights treaties, even the most powerful states promise to respect the human rights of their populations. Most states have ratified most of these treaties. The treaties bar genocide, torture, arbitrary detention, and other rights-violating activities. Although the treaties lack an enforcement mechanism, nations appear to take the treaties seriously enough to defend themselves against accusations that they have violated their treaty obligations, both in public statements and before various international and regional bodies that monitor compliance with human rights treaties.”


An understanding is evolving that nations have a duty to prevent human rights abuses

Richard Just (staff managing editor), “Evils and Excuses,” The New Republic, September 9, 2009, p. 29

“R2P may sound like a banal idea, but in fact it is quite radical. The belief that governments have a moral responsibility to protect people in other countries who are potential victims of crimes against humanity, and that human rights in such extreme circumstances supersede state sovereignty, has not exactly been the norm throughout human history. Reasonable people can certainly disagree about the proper means for implementing this concept, haggling over when to apply it and how; but the idea itself is a genuine innovation in international politics, and — for liberals who wish to emphasize human rights over anti-imperialism — a welcome one.” [R2P = Responsibility To Protect, the doctrine that nations have a duty to intervene in other nations when genocide and other mass violations of human rights occur]


Promotion of human rights plausibly leads to stronger protection of those rights

“Don’t Be Evil” (unsigned editorial), The New Republic, May 13, 2010, p. 1

“Is there a single intellectual serving time in a Chinese prison who would be free if Obama were more inclined toward human rights? Perhaps not. Would Omar Al Bashir still be in power if our envoy to Sudan were more effective? Almost certainly yes. Why, then, should an American president expend precious time on human rights? It’s a fair question, but it can be answered with a nod to both history and principle. For, while it is never possible to know in advance where or when these sorts of stands will yield results, we know that sometimes, over the long run, they do lead to progress. We know that human rights language in the Helsinki Accords gave dissidents a rallying cry inside the Soviet Union. We know that international isolation exacted a price on apartheid South Africa. And we know that, even when these efforts do not work out perfectly, standing with dissidents and liberals the world over is always an honorable thing for a president — especially a liberal one — to do.”


1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16

Похожие:

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconRelated or contrasting ideas may be found in the sections on Animal Rights, Knowledge, Life, Medical Ethics, Nature, Progress, and Science

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconRelated or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Absolutism, Consequentialism, Duty, Intuitionism, Needs, Nietzsche, Relativism, Subjectivism, and Values

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconBout 90 per cent of all Charter arguments raised in reported cases across all Canadian courts deal with one of the legal rights sections sections 7-14

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconNuclear Weapons and Nonproliferation”

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconClockwise from bottom left: Atoms for Peace, speech by Dwight D. Eisenhower; Saint-Laurent Nuclear Power Plant; Nuclear power plant; Mushroom cloud at Nevada

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconBomb Scare: The History & future of Nuclear Weapons

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract icon1. What is the difference between Employment Law and Contract Law?

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconLaw, Social Justice & Global Development (An Electronic Law Journal)

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconLaw, Social Justice & Global Development (An Electronic Law Journal)

Related or contrasting ideas may be found in the following sections: Nuclear Weapons, Peace, Rights, Rule of Law, and the Social Contract iconLaw, Social Justice & Global Development (An Electronic Law Journal)

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница