Acknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society's Minute Books. Introduction




НазваниеAcknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society's Minute Books. Introduction
страница14/16
Дата28.10.2012
Размер1.29 Mb.
ТипДокументы
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16

Notes and References



In all references the place of publication is London, unless it is stated otherwise. When short-title references are used, the full citation will be found earlier within the same chapter. The following abbreviations are used:


ER Eugenics Review

EES Eugenics Education Society

Galton, Essays Francis Galton, Essays in Eugenics (London, 1909)

Pearson, Life Karl Pearson, The Life, Letters and Labours of Francis Galton 3vols(Cambridge,1914-30), I(1914), ll (1924), IIIA & lllB (1930).

Problems in Problems in Eugenics. Papers Communicated to Eugenics the First International Eugenics Congress held

at The University of London, July 24th to 30th, 1912, 2 vols (London, 1912-13).


Introduction



  1. Francis Galton, 'Eugenics: Its Definition, Scope and Aims', Nature, 70 (1904),
    82; also in Galton, Essays, p. 35.

  2. Caleb Williams Saleeby, Parenthood and Race Culture: An Outline of
    Eugenics (1909), p. 182.

  3. John Higham, Strangers in the Land: Patterns of American Nativism,
    1860-1925 (New York, 1963), pp. 150-1.

  4. Mark H. Haller, Eugenics: Hereditarian Attitudes in American Thought (New
    Brunswick, 1963). See also Donald K. Pickens, Eugenics and the Progressives
    (Nashville, Tennessee, 1968).

Chapter 1

  1. Sir James B arr, The Aim and Scope of Eugenics (Edinburgh, 1911), p. 15.

  2. [Henry] Havelock Ellis, The Problem of Race-Regeneration (1911), p. 67.


119


Notes and References


  1. Illustrated London News, 12 March 1910.

  2. F. C. S. Schiller, Eugenics and Politics (1926), p. vii.

  3. Charles Wicksteed Armstrong, The Survival of the Unfittest (1927), p. 169.

  4. M. Dachert, the founder of a eugenic community which flourished in
    Strasbourg in the inter-war years, is said to have derived his ideas straight
    from The Origin of Species; see ER, 23 (1931-2), 3.

  5. Cited in G. Himmelfarb, Darwin and the Darwinian Revolution (1959), p.

351.

8. One of Darwin's sons, the botanist, Francis Darwin, said in the course of his
Galton Lecture in February 1914 that his father, in the first edition of The Des­
cent of Man,
'distinctly gives his adherence to the eugenic idea by his assertion
that man might by selection do something for the moral and physical qualities
of the race'; see ER, 6 (1914-15), 16.

9. John Humphrey Noyes, 1811—86. See the entry in Dictionary of American

Biography.

10. Mark H. Haller, Eugenics: Hereditarian Attitudes in American Thought (New

Brunswick, 1963), pp. 37-8.

  1. But, while quoting Galton's scientific work, Noyes attacks Galton in this book
    for not advancing a practical programme; when it comes to what should be
    done, Galton, he claims, 'subsides into the meekest conservatism'. See J. H.
    Noyes, Essay on Scientific Propagation (Oneida, New York, [1875?]), p. 8.

  2. Havelock Ellis, The Task of Social Hygiene (1912), pp. 29-30.

  3. Many of her 'scientific' theories, in fact, ran counter to the central propositions
    of the eugenists, e.g., The most active agent in generating the unfit is fatigue
    poison ...'; much 'family degeneration ... is due to physical exhaustion from
    overwork or the lack of sufficient light and fresh air'; see V. C. Woodhull-
    Martin, The Rapid Multiplication of the Unfit (1891), p. 10. It is Mrs
    Woodhull-Martin's oft-repeated contention that those who were unfit through
    fatigue produced degenerate offspring. Although she lived the latter part of her
    life in London, where she edited a weekly, The Humanitarian, H. G. Wells is
    the only British writer known to me to acknowledge any debt to her; see his
    Mankind in the Making (1903), p. 39.




  1. F. Galton, Memories of My Life (1908), p. 300.

  2. On Galton, see C. P. Blacker, Eugenics: Galton and After (1952), part I; Pear­
    son, Life; D. W. Forrest, Francis Galton: The Life and Work of a Victorian
    Genius (1974).

Chapter 2

  1. Galton, Essays, pp. 1-34.

  2. ibid., pp. 34-43.

  3. Edgar Schuster, Eugenics (1912), 46-7; D. W. Forrest, Francis Galton: The
    Life and Work of a Victorian Genius (1974), pp. 260, 269-70.

  4. A brief account of the early days of the Society is to be found in Faith Schenk &


120


Notes and References


A. S.Parkes, 'The Activities of the Eugenics Society', ER, 60(1968), 142-61.

  1. Birmingham Daily Post, 16 November 1907.

  2. EES Minutes, 9 December 1907 and 14 January 1908.

  3. Pall Mall Gazette, 27 February 1908.

  4. Schenk & Parkes, 'The Activities of the Eugenics Society', p. 143.

  5. EES Annual Report, 1908, pp. 21-5.

10. ibid., 1913-14.

11. ER, 5(1913-14), 1-64.

  1. William Bateson, F.R. S. Naturalist; His Essays and Addresses, together with
    a Short Account of his Life by Beatrice Bateson (1928).

  2. Editorial in British Medical Journal, no vol. no. (23 August 1913), 508-9.

  3. EES Annual Report, 1911-12, pp. 23-5.

  4. On the relationship between the early stage in the development of British
    sociology and eugenics, see Philip Abrams, The Origins of British Sociology:
    1834-1914 (Chicago, Illinois, 1968), and R. J. Halliday, 'The Sociological
    Movement, the Sociological Society and the Genesis of Academic Sociology in
    Britain', Sociological Review, 16(1968), 377-98.

  5. Nature, 84(1910), 431.

  6. ER, 5(1913-14), 385.

  7. See Records of the Cambridge University Eugenics Society, housed in the
    Library of the Eugenics Society, 69 Eccleston Square, London SW1V 1 PJ.
    Keynes, in fact, delivered the Galton Lecture in 1937.

  8. H. J. Laski, 'The Scope of Eugenics', Westminster Review, 174, (1910), 25-34;
    Pearson, Life, IIIB, 606, 608-9; [Basil] Kingsley Martin, Harold Laski
    (1893-1950) A Biographical Memoir (1953), pp. 8-12.

  9. EES Annual Report, 1912-13, pp. 5-6.

  10. The controversial address by Shaw referred to, was delivered at a meeting
    organized by the EES and held at Caxton Hall in March 1910; see report in the
    Daily Express, 4 March 1910. The Society's President, Montague
    Crackanthorpe, took the unusual step of dissociating himself from Shaw's
    pronouncement in his address to the next AG.M.; see ESS Annual Report,
    1909-10, p. 1.

  11. A similar thing happened in the U.S.A.; see Mark H. Haller, Eugenics:
    Hereditarian Attitudes in American Thought (New Brunswick, 1963), pp.
    85-6.

  12. Problems in Eugenics, II, 70.

  13. EES Annual Report, 1912-13, p. 6.

  14. Sidney Webb, 'Eugenics and the Poor Law: The Minority Report', ER, 2
    (1910-11), 233-41, especially p. 240.

  15. L. Darwin, 'The Aims and Methods of Eugenical Societies', in Eugenics,
    Genetics and the Family: Volume I, Scientific Papers of the Second Inter­
    national Congress of Eugenics held at American Museum of Natural History,
    New York, September 22-28, 1921 (Baltimore, Maryland, 1923), pp. 5-19.


121


Notes and References



  1. Nor were Galton and Pearson reassured when they read in the newspapers that
    one of the founder members of the Council had been convicted of indecent
    assault on a bus conductor. The person in question, Dr Stanton Coit, was later
    acquitted on appeal to Sessions; see Pearson, Life, IIIA, 335-6; and The Times,
    26 March 1908.

  2. EES Minutes, 3 March 1909. See also Forrest, Francis Galton, p. 278.

  3. W. Marshall, 'Montague Crackanthorpe: Obituary', ER, 5 (1913-14), 352-3.

  4. ESS Minutes, 1 February 1911 and 1 March 1911.

  5. ibid., 1 March 1911.

  6. He later returned to America, then served as a visiting lecturer to the Central
    China University, before taking up a post of lecturer in civics and philosophy
    at Rice Institute, Houston, Texas. He died in Houston, on 14 November 1964;
    see Who Was Who in America.

  7. The Times, 27 March 1943.

  8. The scientific background to this controversy has been ably analysed in P.
    Froggart & N. C. Nevin, 'The "Law of Ancestral Heredity" and the
    Mendelian-Ancestrian Controversy in England, 1889-1906', Journal of
    Medical Genetics, 8 (1971), 1-36.

  9. EES Minutes, 12 February 1908.

  10. David Heron, for example, resigned from the Council of the Society in 1910;
    see EES Minutes, 2 March 1910.

  11. Nature, 92(1914), 606, 660-1.

  12. Pearson, Life, IIIA, 405-9.

  13. C. W. Saleeby, The Progress of Eugenics (1914), p. 20. Review of Archibald
    Reid's Principles of Heredity in Daily Chronicle, 4 June 1910.




  1. Pearson, Life, IIIA, 405-7.

  2. Francis Darwin, 'Francis Galton, 1822-1911', ER, 6 (1914-15), 1-17 (p. 13).

  3. K. Pearson & E. Elderton, The Relative Strength of Nurture and Nature, se­
    cond edition (1915), p. 32.

  4. Haller, Eugenics, pp. 67-8.

  5. David Heron, Mendelism and the Problem of Mental Defect: I, A Criticism of
    Recent American Work, Questions of the Day and of the Fray No. 7 (1913).

  6. ER, 5(1913-14), 367.

  7. Galton read this book in proof. His comment to Pearson was: 'though there is
    much I would myself strike out, [I] expect it will do good. He has eminently the
    art of popular writing with fluency ...'; see Pearson, Life, IIIB, 597. Galton's
    toleration of Saleeby, however, was to disappear almost entirely over the next
    twelve months.

  8. For example, 'It is to Dr Saleeby's shoulders that Mr Galton's mantle has been
    transferred ...'; Glasgow Herald, 22 May 1909.

  9. Galton wrote to Pearson on 7 May 1910 as follows: 'The Council of the
    Eugenics Education Society have, I learn, extruded Dr S. by not putting his
    name on the candidate list. As I am told, certain members of the Council


122


strongly objected to serving longer with him, and Mrs G [otto] undertook to tell him so, which she did, doubtless with all practicable tact, but I have reason to know his feelings are much wounded'; see Pearson, Life, IIIA, 428. But the Society's Minutes for 5 May 1910 indicate that Saleeby's name went forward for election, but that he was one of the unsuccessful candidates.

  1. EES Minutes, 15 October 1913. Saleeby caused further embarrassment by
    then indicating his willingness to lecture the Society on any subject it chose;
    ibid., 21 November 1913.

  2. Saleeby, Progress of Eugenics, passim.

Chapter 3

  1. G. R. Searle, The Quest for National Efficiency, 1899-1914 (Oxford, 1971),
    passim.

  2. Arthur Newsholme 'Alleged Physical Degeneration in Towns', Public Health,
    17(1905), 292.

  3. Gareth Stedman Jones, Outcast London (Oxford, 1971), especially chapter 6.

  4. This point has been made by Philip Abrams, The Origins of British Sociology:
    1834-1914
    (Chicago, Illinois, 1968), p. 124.

  5. Hansard, 4th series, 160, cols 1392-5, 16 July 1906.

  6. For example, W. C. D. Whetham & C. D. Whetham, An Introduction to
    Eugenics (Cambridge, 1912), p. 37; L. Darwin, The Need for Eugenic Reform
    (1926), p. 62. -^

  7. The Times, 18 June 1909.

  8. Quoted from Local Government Board report in ER, 1 (1909-10), 143.

  9. According to Dr Mott in his address to the 1912 International Eugenics
    Congress, Problems in Eugenics,!, 405.




  1. For example, A. F. Tredgold, 'The Study of Eugenics', Quarterly Review, 217
    (1912), 50-1.

  2. J. B. Haycraft, Darwinism and Race Progress (1895), pp. 62-3, 68.

  3. Arnold Henry White, Efficiency and Empire [1901], edited with an introduc­
    tion and notes by G. R. Searle, Society and the Victorians XV (Brighton,
    1973), p. 110.

  4. H. Giffard-Ruffe, 'A Plea for Posterity', Westminster Review, 156(1901), p. 33.

  5. Weekly Sun, 28 July 1900.

  6. 'Miles', 'Where to Get Men', Contemporary Review, 81 (1902), 78-86; Bentley
    B. Gilbert, The Evolution of National Insurance in Great Britain (1966), pp.
    84-6.

  7. Cited in A. Watt Smyth, Physical Deterioration: Its Causes and the Cure
    (1904), pp. 13-14.

  8. The arguments have been usefully summarized in ibid., pp. 14-17, 21—2,
    297-301.

  9. Report of the Inter-Departmental Committee on Physical Deterioration,
    Parliamentary Papers, 1904[Cd. 2175],xxxn, 1.


123


Notes and References


  1. For example, the Report was cited by the Manchester Guardian, 22 March
    1910, in its public altercation with Pearson.

  2. Havelock Ellis, The Problem of Race-Regeneration (1911), p. 30.

  3. Jones, Outcast London, p. 127.

  4. Nature, 72(1905), 331.

  5. Havelock Ellis, The Task of Social Hygiene (1912), p. 181.

  6. G. A. Reid, 'Recent Researches in Alcoholism', Bedrock, 1 (1912), 37-8.

  7. For example, Lt.-Col. W. Hill-Climo, cited in ER, 1 (1909-10), 72-3.

  8. S. Webb, 'Physical Degeneracy or Race Suicide?', The Times, 16 October
    1906.

  9. A. E. Crawley, 'Primitive Eugenics', ER, 1 (1909-10), 275-80 (p. 278).

  10. W. C. D. Whetham, Eugenics and Unemployment (Cambridge, 1910), p. 15.

  11. National Birth-Rate Commission, The Declining Birth-Rate (1916), p. 9.

  12. W. C. D. Whetham, 'Heredity and Destitution', ER, 3 (1911-12), 131-42 (p.
    139).

  13. National Birth-Rate Commission, Problems of Population and Parenthood
    (1920), p. xxxix.

  14. David Heron, On the Relation of Fertility in Man to Social Status, and on the
    Changes in this Relation that have taken Place during the Last Fifty Years,
    Drapers' Company Research Memoirs, Studies in National Deterioration I
    (1906), p. 21.

  15. Eugenists sometimes appealed to social reformers to co-operate with them by
    arguing that, whatever view be taken of the importance of heredity, the un-
    desirability of a differential birth-rate could hardly be denied.

  16. C. W. Saleeby, The Progress of Eugenics (1914), p. 27.

  17. Heron, Relation of Fertility to Social Status, p. 21.

  18. K. Pearson, The Scope and Importance to the State of the Science of National
    Eugenics (1909), p. 36.

  19. A. F. Tredgold, 'The Feeble-Minded', Contemporary Review, 97 (1910), 721.

  20. W. C. D. Whetham in a review of Archdall Reid's Laws of Heredity, ER, 3
    (1911-12), 66-7.

  21. W. C. D. Whetham & C. D. Whetham, The Family and the Nation (1909), pp.
    148-57.

  22. For example, K. Pearson, Social Problems: Their Treatment, Past Present and
    Future (\912), p. 38.

  23. F. C. S. Schiller, 'Eugenics and Polities', Hibbert Journal, 12 (1913-14),
    241-59 (p. 250).

  24. Whethams, Family and Nation, p. 131.

  25. Whethams, Introduction to Eugenics, p. 59; K. Pearson, The Groundwork of
    Eugenics (1909), p. 37.

  26. George P. Mudge, 'Biological Iconoclasm, Mendelian Inheritance and Human
    Society', Mendel Journal, 1 (1909), 45-124 (p. 95).

  27. Whethams, Introduction to Eugenics, p. 36.

ER, 2(1910-11), 2

124


Notes and References


  1. For example, the Report was cited by the Manchester Guardian, 22 March
    1910, in its public altercation with Pearson.

  2. Havelock Ellis, The Problem of Race-Regeneration (1911), p. 30.

  3. Jones, Outcast London, p. 127.

  4. Nature, 72(1905), 331.

  5. Havelock Ellis, The Task of Social Hygiene (1912), p. 181.

  6. G. A. Reid, 'Recent Researches in Alcoholism', Bedrock, 1 (1912), 37-8.

  7. For example, Lt.-Col. W. Hill-Climo, cited in ER, 1 (1909-10), 72-3.

  8. S. Webb, 'Physical Degeneracy or Race Suicide?', The Times, 16 October
    1906.

  9. A. E. Crawley, 'Primitive Eugenics', ER, 1 (1909-10), 275-80 (p. 278).

  10. W. C. D. Whetham, Eugenics and Unemployment (Cambridge, 1910), p. 15.

  11. National Birth-Rate Commission, The Declining Birth-Rate (1916), p. 9.

  12. W. C. D. Whetham, 'Heredity and Destitution', ER, 3 (1911-12), 131-42 (p.
    139).

  13. National Birth-Rate Commission, Problems of Population and Parenthood
    (1920), p. xxxix.

  14. David Heron, On the Relation of Fertility in Man to Social Status, and on the
    Changes in this Relation that have taken Place during the Last Fifty Years,
    Drapers' Company Research Memoirs, Studies in National Deterioration I
    (1906), p. 21.

  15. Eugenists sometimes appealed to social reformers to co-operate with them by
    arguing that, whatever view be taken of the importance of heredity, the un-
    desirability of a differential birth-rate could hardly be denied.

  16. C. W. Saleeby, The Progress of Eugenics (1914), p. 27.

  17. Heron, Relation of Fertility to Social Status, p. 21.

  18. K. Pearson, The Scope and Importance to the State of the Science of National
    Eugenics (1909), p. 36.

  19. A. F. Tredgold, 'The Feeble-Minded', Contemporary Review, 97 (1910), 721.

  20. W. C. D. Whetham in a review of Archdall Reid's Laws of Heredity, ER, 3
    (1911-12), 66-7.

  21. W. C. D. Whetham & C. D. Whetham, The Family and the Nation (1909), pp.
    148-57.

  22. For example, K. Pearson, Social Problems: Their Treatment, Past Present and
    Future (\912), p. 38.

  23. F. C. S. Schiller, 'Eugenics and Polities', Hibbert Journal, 12 (1913-14),
    241-59 (p. 250).

  24. Whethams, Family and Nation, p. 131.

  25. Whethams, Introduction to Eugenics, p. 59; K. Pearson, The Groundwork of
    Eugenics (1909), p. 37.

  26. George P. Mudge, 'Biological Iconoclasm, Mendelian Inheritance and Human
    Society', Mendel Journal, 1 (1909), 45-124 (p. 95).

  27. Whethams, Introduction to Eugenics, p. 36.

  28. ER, 2(1910-11), 2.


125


Notes and References


  1. W. C. D. Whetham & C. D. Whetham, 'Decadence and Civilisation', Hibbert
    Journal, 10(1911-12), 179-200 (p. 186).

  2. D. Heron, A First Study of the Statistics of Insanity and the Inheritance of the
    Insane Diathesis, Eugenics Laboratory Memoirs II (1907), p. 6.

  3. Robert Reid Rentoul, Race Culture: or Race Suicide? (1906), p. xi.

  4. K. Pearson, Darwinism, Medical Progress and Eugenics (1912), p. 23.

  5. Havelock Ellis, Social Hygiene, p. 42, fn. 1.

  6. Mark H. Haller, Eugenics: Hereditarian Attitudes in American Thought (New
    Brunswick, 1963), pp. 106-8. Arnold White made a modest contribution of his
    own to this morbid literary genre: The Views of 'Vanoc': An Englishman's
    Outlook (19\0), pp. 275-6.

  7. W. R. Inge, Outspoken Essays: Second Series (1927), p. 266; W. C. Sullivan,
    'Eugenics and Crime', ER, 1 (1909-10), 116-7; E. J. Lidbetter, Heredity and
    the Social Problem Group (1933), p. 18.

  8. A. F. Tredgold, 'The Study of Eugenics', Quarterly Review, 217 (1912), 59.

  9. R. B. Cattell, The Fight for our National Intelligence (1937), p. 124.

  10. Quoted in W. A. Chappie, The Fertility of the Unfit (Melbourne, [1904]), p. 91.

  11. See Haller, Eugenics, pp. 15-16.

  12. Charles Goring, The English Convict: A Statistical Study (1913), especially
    pp. 364, 370-4.

  13. Havelock Ellis, Race-Regeneration, pp. 40-1.

  14. Haller, Eugenics, chapter 7.

  15. Report of the Royal Commission on the Care and Control of the Feeble-
    Minded, Parliamentary Papers, 1908 [Cd. 4202], XXXIX, 159, para. 589.

  16. A. J. Balfour, 'Decadence' [1908], in Essays Speculative and Political (1920),
    pp. 1-52.

  17. For example, A. J. Hubbard, The Fate of Empires: being an Inquiry into the
    Stability of Civilisation (1913). See the critical comments on this literature by
    Sidney Low: 'Is Our Civilisation Dying?', Fortnightly Review, 93 (1913),
    627-39.

  18. W. Bateson, 'Heredity in the Physiology of Nations', The Speaker, 14 October
    1905.

  19. Galton, Essays, pp. 38-9.

  20. Pearson, Groundwork of Eugenics, p. 20.

Chapter 4

  1. Quoted by C. W. Saleeby, Parenthood and Race Culture (1909), p. 201.

  2. Edward Fry et al, The Problem of the Feeble-Minded (1909), p. 85.

  3. A. White, 'Eugenics and the National Efficiency', ER, 1 (1909-10), 105-11.

  4. W. C. D. Whetham & C. D. Whetham, The Family and the Nation (1909), p. 9.

  5. ER, 2(1910-11), p. 150.

  6. Galton's observations in the Westminster Gazette, 26 June 1908; K. Pearson,
    The Academic Aspect of the Science of National Eugenics (1911), p. 27; James


126


Notes and References


Illustrated by an Examination of Russian and Polish Jewish Children', Annals of Eugenics, 1 (1925-6), especially pp. 5—9, 126-7. The issue has been con­veniently summarized in N. Pastore, The Nature-Nurture Controversy (New York, 1949), pp. 33-6.

  1. EES Minutes, 14 March 1913.

  2. K. Pearson, The Scope and Importance to the State of the Science of National
    Eugenics (\90% p. 44.

  3. W. C. D. Whetham & C. D. Whetham, Heredity and Society (1912), pp. 46-7.

  4. A. White, The Views of'Vanoc':An Englishman's Outlook (1910), p. 284.

  5. Redcliffe N. Salaman, 'Heredity and the Jew', ER, 3 (1911-12), 187-200 (pp.
    197, 199). This paper was criticized by a prominent Jewish eugenist, Sidney
    Herbert, in the following number of the Eugenics Review: 3, no. 4 (January
    1912), 349-51. Incidentally, the young Laski also wrote, at Pearson's instiga­
    tion, an article refuting Salaman, which was later published in Biometrika; see
    [Basil] Kingsley Martin, Harold Laski (1893-1950) (1953), p. 11, fn. 4.

  6. ER, 1 (1909-10), 222.

  7. J. M. Winter, 'The Webbs and the Non-White World: A Case of Socialist
    Racialism', Journal of Contemporary History, 9, no. 1 (January 1974), 181-92.

  8. W. McDougall, 'Psychology in the Service of Eugenics', ER, 5 (1913-14),
    295-308 (pp. 306-7).

  9. The tests applied to American soldiers during the First World War were
    frequently offered as evidence of Negro inferiority and of the superiority of the
    old 'Anglo-Saxon' stocks, although, of course, this interpretation was
    challenged even at the time.

  10. EES Minutes, 1 February 1911. It is here reported that Professor Haddon had
    suggested books for the guidance of the South African gentleman.

  11. For example, Whethams, Family and Nation, pp. 157—8.

  12. See R. Ruggles Gates, Heredity and Eugenics (1923), passim.

  13. For example, 'Vanoc', 'The Common Sense of Heredity: Devil or Saviour?',
    Referee, 6 September 1908.

  14. 'Black and White Marriages. The New American Crusade: Scientific Views',
    Observer, 3 May 1908.

  15. K. Pearson, Social Problems: Their Treatment, Past Present and
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16

Похожие:

Acknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society\С. В. Тихонова, К. Е. Халин Политическая мифология в сетевом обществе: от смерти политики к “умным толпам”?
«mass century» was struggle for authority of the political leaders supported by different groups of the population. Second half XX...
Acknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society\Isf 100D: Introduction to Technology, Society, and Culture

Acknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society\Isf 100D: Introduction to Technology, Society, and Culture

Acknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society\Keywords Mamak Stalls, Malaysia, Multicultural Society, Ethnic groups introduction

Acknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society\Botanical society of america annual reports, 2003 Officers A. President (Scott Russell) Botanical Society Of America

Acknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society\Of Bioinformatics – draft#1 (Book chapter for American Society for Information Science & Technology, vol. 40, 2005) Gerald Benoît Introduction

Acknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society\1. Introduction & acknowledgement

Acknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society\Мэй Р. М497 Сила и невинность
Данное издание выпушено в рлм клх п рог рлм м ы Центрально-Европейского Университета «Books tor Civil Society» при поддержке Центра...
Acknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society\Concrete Society

Acknowledgement I am grateful to the Council of the Eugenics Society for the help they have given me, and for permitting me to see and to quote from the Society\Of the acoustical society of america

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница