International Journal of Historical Teaching, Learning and Research Volume 5 Number 2 July 2005




НазваниеInternational Journal of Historical Teaching, Learning and Research Volume 5 Number 2 July 2005
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International Journal of Historical Teaching, Learning and Research







Volume 5 Number 2 July 2005







ISSN 1472 – 9466







Editorial Board






Editorial





3

Articles

Lieke van Wijk

4




The Learning and Teaching of History in Europe: 
EUROCLIO’s Enquiries Compared









Peter Brett

10




Citizenship through History – What Is Good Practice?
 







Jerome Freeman

28




The Current State of the 4-19 History Curriculum in England and Possible Future Developments: a QCA Perspective 







 







Jon Nichol

36




From Russia with Love: a History Curriculum for the 21st Century









Lidija Radulović and Vera Rajović
How to Teach Serbian History Students about School Failure and Cultural Diversity 


47




Maria Auxiliadora Schmidt and Tania Braga Garcia

53




Teaching History from Documents in the Family Archives: A Social Experiment with Brazilian children
















Dursun Dilek and Gülçin Soğucakli Yapici

61




The Use of Stories in the Teaching of History















Stuart Foster


73




The British Empire and Commonwealth in World War II: Selection and Omission in English History Textbooks









Notes for Contributors










History Education Centre:

Faculty of Education,

University of Plymouth

UK

www.ex.ac.uk/historyresource

J.D.Nichol@ex.ac.uk


Editorial Board

Editors


Jon Nichol, University of Exeter, EnglandRobert Guyver, College of St. Mark and St. John, Plymouth, England

Kate Watson, University of Exeter, England

Jacqui Dean, Leeds Metropolitan University, England

ICT Consultant/Webmaster

Kevin O'Connell, University of Exeter, England

Assistant Editors


Keith Barton, University of Cincinnati, USA

Hilary Cooper, University of Lancaster, England

Richard Dargie, University of Edinburgh, Scotland

Ross Dunn, San Diego State University, USA

Peter Fisher, University of Newcastle, England

Stuart Foster, University of Georgia, USA

Penelope Harnett, University of the West of England, Bristol, England

Terry Hayden, University of East Anglia, Norwich, England

Peter Lee, Institute of Education, University of London, England

Joke van der Leeuw-Roord, Director, Euroclio, Brussels, Belgium

Garry Mills, University of Nottingham, England

Rob Sieborger, University of of Cape Town, South Africa

Andrew Sokholov, Ushinskii Pedagogic University, Yaroslavl, Russia

Yosanne Vella, University of Malta

Sam Wineburg, Washington State University, USA

Suzanne Wilson, Michigan State University, USA


Editorial

History, Citizenship and Identity

9. 48 a.m. on the 7th July 2005 brought graphically to the forefront of my mind the interface between History Education, Citizenship and the Global Village in which we all live. After a reasonably civilised breakfast and a congenial browse through The Times I was walking from the hotel with a colleague to our meeting. As we turned out of Tavistock Square the bus bomb exploded with a deep, sickening, heavy and terrifying thud. Terrorism in its most traumatic and visible form had been transplanted once more into the centre of British national life. The transplant this time had not come via the cultural milieu of a section of society who felt they lived in an occupied and brutalised colony, Northern Ireland. It was home grown and genuinely indigenous through the medium of Jihadists born and raised in Leeds, England. It became starkly clear that their British education had done nothing to give them a sense of belonging and identity, indeed, the converse. While History Education cannot claim in terms of both the cultural messages and the mentality that it develops for citizenship in a liberal, plural democracy to have the answer to the Jihadic threat, it can certainly be placed at the forefront of an educational agenda that helps ensure that we do not cultivate, foster and develop a deadly enemy within.

This volume of IJHLTR addresses head on a number of crucial general issues of education for the citizens of the Global Village. It draws upon a wide range of countries, cultures and academic traditions, ranging from South America to the Balkans, Russia and the United Kingdom. All of the papers share a common theme; how can pupils genuinely develop an understanding of their position in the world through the medium that history provides? History as such has the two faces of mythology: mythos and logos.

Mythos is the repository of the common stories that we can draw upon and share in constructing our own individual and collective identities. Logos is the other side of the history education equation; the syntactic and substantive concepts that give the discipline its form and shape, the processes and related skills that historians draw upon, their protocols in undertaking historical study and enquiry in different modes, for example be it as a biographer, family, local, diplomatic, economic or social historian. The logos dimension is what gives ‘Doing History’ its educative value, it equips young citizens with the thinking tools to be informed, sceptical enquirers who can ask searching questions and demand answers that are evidentially based and plausible. As such, historical education enables the myths, legends and stories that provide the rich repository of national identity to be subject to rigorous scrutiny. Viewing them through the historical lens enables them to emerge as stronger and more substantial supports for the civilised society that we all cherish and succour. History Education can be an ingredient in the antidote to the poison of extremism in whatever form it takes, be it fundamentalism, communism, capitalism or some other ism that claims the right to force itself down the throats of the rest of society. Or, as occurred, on the 7th July, to blow them up at will and without mercy.


Jon Nichol

Developments in Heritage Education in Europe:

EUROCLIO’s Enquiries Compared

Lieke van Wijk, EUROCLIO, The Hague, The Netherlands

Abstract This paper reviews three surveys carried out by EUROCLIO in 1999, 2003 and 2004 and discusses the results which provide information about the different ways in which the key concepts of heritage and national identity in European history education are dealt with.

Keywords Heritage education in Europe
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