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From ssteele@clark.netTue Apr 15 11:25:12 1997

Date: Tue, 4 Mar 1997 07:49:01 -0500

From: "Stephen F. Steele"

Reply to: scishops@listserv.ncsu.edu

To: Multiple recipients of list


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SAS ANNOUNCES TWO PUBLICATIONS ON APPLIED SOCIOLOGY

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Dear Colleague in Applied Sociology,


It's March and time to make your book orders for the Fall 1997 term...


In order to help us plan our production runs, THE SOCIETY FOR APPLIED

SOCIOLOGY (SAS) would like you to consider 2 publications for your Fall 1997

classes.


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Publication 1) SOCIAL INSIGHT magazine... Edited by Mark Iutcovich

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Are you...

* Looking for an inexpensive way to present the "applied side" of sociology

to your students?

* Concerned that the books you currently use neglect the application of

sociology?

* Looking for ways to give students exposure to sociologists in action, in

direct, understandable language?

The Society for Applied Sociology is about to run its second printing of its

first issue of its magazine:


SOCIAL INSIGHT: KNOWLEDGE AT WORK


"Social INSIGHT" provides nine articles written by contemporary applied

sociologists in an engaging 52-page magazine format that covers "Market

Research" to the "Infant Industry;" "Group Homes" to the "War on Drugs."

The magazine already has demonstrated value as a teaching tool with

undergraduates.


Price (from SAS, does not include bookstore "mark-up" or sales tax):


Non-members $8.00 (plus handling)/copy

Members $5.00 (plus handling)/ copy

Departmental Members may order multiple copies through their bookstore for

$5.00/copy (plus handling).


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Publication 2) DIRECTIONS IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY

edited by Stephen F. Steele and Joyce Miller Iutcovich

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Are you...

* Looking for a book that will provide your students with the collective

thoughts and vision of some of the contemporary leaders in applied

sociology's re-emergence over the last decade?

* Trying to find a book that helps students understand the context,

definition and tools that are all part of applied sociology?

* Attempting to ground applied sociology...past, present and future...for

you and your students?


The Society for Applied Sociology is about to run its first printing of it's

cornerstone book:


DIRECTIONS IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY

Presidential Addresses of the Society for Applied Sociology


"Directions in Applied Sociology" provides eleven addresses by contemporary

presidents of SAS. The four-part book covers the past and future, applying

sociology, social change and intervention as well as vision for applied

sociology's future. In addition, the work contains an original introduction

on the professionalization of applied sociology. The book would be useful

for students in applied courses as well as departments that are currently

supporting or that are interested in starting applied programs.

Price (from SAS, does not include bookstore "mark-up" or sales tax):


Non-members $15.00 (plus handling)/copy

Members and Departmental Members $13.00 (plus handling)/copy


------------------------------------------------


WHAT I'M ASKING YOU TO DO...


These publications are a "win-win-win" proposition. Here's why -


"Win..." Students and faculty get access to readable, contemporary examples

of applied sociology ...


"Win..." The Society for Applied Sociology benefits from the distribution

of this work...


"Win..." Sociology wins from the strengthening of its "applied side."


SO SAS MAY MORE APPROPRIATELY PLAN...


SAS needs to target its printing production on anticipated orders. Thus,

please advise me of your plans regarding these publications by completing

the following -


Your Name:


Affiliation:


E-mail address:


I plan to place an order through my College/University's bookstore for -


Provide

# of copies

here..........

[ ] SOCIAL INSIGHT magazine, Issue 1...

Edited by Mark Iutcovich


[ ] DIRECTIONS IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY

Edited by Stephen F. Steele and Joyce Miller Iutcovich


Please return this form via E-mail to ssteele@clark.net as soon as possible.


Bookstore orders may be placed by sending standard bookstore ordering forms to


Executive Officer, Society for Applied Sociology

c/o Anne Arundel Community College

Division of Social Sciences

101 College Parkway

Arnold, MD 21012


or


Call 410-541-2369

Fax 410-541-2239

E-mail: ssteele@clark.net


----------------------------------------


Thanks for your consideration!


Sincerely,


Steve Steele, Acting SAS Executive Officer.


** Feel Free to copy and distribute this as appropriate!


Stephen F. Steele, Ph.D.

Acting Executive Officer, Society for Applied Sociology

*******************************


Anne Arundel Community College Applied Data Associates,Inc

101 College Parkway 901 Randell Road

Arnold, Maryland 21012 Severna Park, Maryland 21146

Phone: 410-541-2369 Phone/Fax: 410-544-6814

Fax: 410-541-2239


Adjunct Faculty Member, The Johns Hopkins University

Applied Behavioral Sciences, School of Continuing Studies

email: ssteele@clark.net

*******************************


From loka@unix.amherst.eduTue Apr 15 11:24:58 1997

Date: Tue, 4 Mar 1997 02:20:50 -0500

From: Loka Institute

Reply to: scishops@listserv.ncsu.edu

To: Multiple recipients of list

Subject: RE: Commercial posts to scishops listserv


Re. Thomas's concern, below (since he asked for the list

managers' views): My own personal reaction (since really

this is just my opinion) is that Thomas's general

principles make sense. However, the two posts

he is referring to seemed to me reasonably germane

to the purposes of this listserv (involving action

research and some participatory research), and I, for

one, certainly wouldn't have heard about the journal and

book series described there any

other way I know of (at least not anytime soon).


So the posts didn't bother me. (Partly they didn't bother me

because we don't get many such posts on the list. In small

number, they seem OK to me. In bulk I would get bothered.)


In any case, the scishops listserv is not moderated, so

even if we achieved a consensus on a policy, it would

be hard to enforce.


Thomas, thanks for posting your concerns/query.


Cheers to all,

Dick Sclove, The Loka Institute


On Fri, 28 Feb 1997, Auf der Heyde, Thomas, Dr wrote:


> Today I received a fairly long posting from this listserver

> advertising books for sale.

>

> Perhaps there is a precedent for this, which I - as a fairly new

> member of the list - may not be aware of, but other lists that I

> subscribe to have a fairly strong policy not to allow commercial

> advertisements to be posted to the list. I don't know how other

> members of this list feel, but I would like to suggest that in view of

> the mountains of information that most of us probably have to sift

> through, commercial advertisements should not be encouraged.

>

> If there are books that members of the list would like to bring to

> the attention of others - having been duely impressed on

> reading them - this would clearly be welcome. Or if someone knows of

> a really good publisher or distributor who is not widely known, then

> a pointer in that direction would also be nice. But direct

> advertisements from a commercial undertaking usually clog up the

> system way out of proportion to the helpful input they may make.

>

> Perhaps the managers of this list would care to comment.

>

> With best wishes,

> Thomas

>

> -------------------------------------------------

> Dr. Thomas Auf der Heyde

> Department of Chemistry & Science Advice Unit,

> University of Cape Town

> Rondebosch 7701, Cape Town, SOUTH AFRICA

>

> Tel +27-21-6502323 Fax +27-21-6897499

> -------------------------------------------------

>

From ppcman@dante.lbl.govTue Apr 15 11:25:37 1997

Date: Tue, 4 Mar 1997 13:17:27 -0500

From: Paul Craig


Reply to: scishops@listserv.ncsu.edu

To: Multiple recipients of list

Subject: Re: Sustainable Community Indicators Website


The March issue of the VirtualPresidio Journal of sustainable development

is out. It focusses on Sustainable San Francico Bay Area


http://eande.lbl.gov/VirtualPresidio

Paul Crai, editor

From lhayles@the-wire.comTue Apr 15 11:25:56 1997

Date: Thu, 6 Mar 1997 13:36:29 -0500

From: Lisa Hayles

Reply to: scishops@listserv.ncsu.edu

To: Multiple recipients of list

Subject: joining the listserv


Hello,

I am the new coordinator of a network of researchers interested in two

main themes: Social Cohesion and the Dynamics of families. CPRN, our

umbrella organization, is a policy research think tank, composed of three

networks in total. (Our sister networks are focused on work and health)

We are in the process of setting up our own electronic mailing list (or

lists) and a collegue suggested I subscibe to your list.


I am fairly new to the net and am interested in how our members and others

interested in related topics can use this forum. Do you have an archive to

which I can gain access to follow older discussions?


***********************************************************

Lisa Hayles

Network Coordinator, Family Network

Canadian Policy Research Networks, Inc. (CPRN)

1329 Bay Street, 2nd fl.

Toronto, ON M5R 2C4

416 944-3721

416 944-2830

lhayles@the-wire.com


CPRN's homepage with information on the Family Network is:

http://www.cprn.com

From mwalker@hsd.uvic.caTue Apr 15 11:26:29 1997

Date: Thu, 13 Mar 1997 17:22:52 -0500

From: Marilyn Walker

Reply to: scishops@listserv.ncsu.edu

To: Multiple recipients of list

Subject: Re: Practioner/Scholar in NVSQ


> Date: Tue, 29 Oct 1996 10:55:03 -0500

> Reply-to: scishops@listserv.ncsu.edu

> From: milofsky@bucknell.edu (Carl Milofsky)

> To: Multiple recipients of list

> Subject: Practioner/Scholar in NVSQ


Do you have a deadline yet for submissions and guidelines? Thanks!


> The NONPROFIT AND VOLUNTARY SECTOR QUARTERLY, the journal of the

> Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action

> (ARNOVA) plans a special issue on practice and scholarship among nonprofit

> organizations. This will be a special, added number of the journal (not

> one of the regular four we publish each year). The following announcement

> appeared in the last ARNOVA Newsletter:

> >

> >CALL FOR PAPERRS; SPECIAL ISSUE OF NVSQ

> >

> >THE NONPROFIT AND VOLUNTARY SECTOR QUARTERLY (NVSQ) seeks papers for a

> >special issue that addresses scholarship and practice. We are encouraging

> >papers that represent joint research of scholars and practitioners, case

> >studies of nonprofit organizations, or applied research for practitioners.

> >Time is of the essence. Deadline will be early in 1997 and the issue

> >should be ready for the publisher by the end of 1997.

> >

> >For more information, contact either Suzanne Feeney, Department of Public

> >Administration, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland OR

> >97207-0751 (telephone: 503-725-3920; e-mail: Suzanne@upa.pdx.edu---as a

> >backup/alternative try feeney@lclark.edu) and/or Editor-in-Chief Carl

> >Milofsky.

> >

> >

>

> Carl Milofsky

> Department of Sociology

> and Anthropology

> Bucknell University

> Lewisburg, PA 17837

> (717) 524-3468; fax: 524-3760

>

>

>

From wrwatts@ucdavis.eduTue Apr 15 11:27:06 1997

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 16:40:04 -0500

From: Russell Watts

Reply to: scishops@listserv.ncsu.edu

To: Multiple recipients of list

Subject: computer assisted professional development


I am looking for research concerning computer assisted learning or online

professional development.


I am working with a Professor on the UC Davis campus and she wants me to

ask around and find out what kinds of research has been done in this area.


Any suggestions?


There is a group of us that will be participating in a pilot project using

online discussion group like learning over the next three months. We will

be working in the language and literacy strand of education and want this

research to be productive for all involved. We will be looking at student

work and finding ways to analize/their work (in small discussion groups),

then look at teacher practice and techniques and look for correlations

(also in small groups). Finally we will be sharing these with each other

(all groups) and working with the findings.


thanks ahead of time

Russ Watts


Russell Watts UC Davis Masters Program/ Education

4 Baggins End

Davis, CA 95616

916.754.1418


From resclove@amherst.eduTue Apr 15 11:26:47 1997

Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 06:45:27 -0500

From: Richard Sclove

Reply to: scishops@listserv.ncsu.edu

To: Multiple recipients of list

Subject: Grassroots Sustainability Conference Report (fwd)


PLEASE REPOST (where appropriate):


A Brief Report from the


International Conference on

Creativity and Innovation at the Grassroots for

Sustainable Natural Resource Management


Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad India

January 11-14, 1997


This conference was co-sponsored by the National Bank for Agricultural

and Rural Development (NABARD); Forests, Trees and People Programme

(FTPP/FAO); International Association for study of Common Property

Resources (USA); International Society of Ecological Economics

(USA); SRISTI (Society for Research and Initiatives for Sustainable

Technologies and Institutions); Oxford Centre of Ethics,

Environment and Society; Gujarat Agro Industries Corporation;

Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR); Indian

Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR); International Development

Research Centre (Canada); Pew Conservation Scholar Award (to Prof.

Anil K. Gupta); and also supported by the World Bank, Commonwealth

Foundation, Honey Bee Network.


Context:


The search for sustainable solutions to the problem of managing

natural resources world over is pointing in the direction of

peoples' initiatives as a possible source of ideas. The reasons

are obvious. Market-induced as well as the state-influenced

interventions have often been guided by short-term interest.

Sustainability requires widening the decision making horizon and

extending the time frame. Local communities and individual

innovators who share an eco-compatible world view have developed

ethical norms and corresponding technological and institutional

arrangements which help in achieving sustainable use of resources.

However, with time, the erosion of knowledge of such practices has

taken place at a faster pace than the erosion of natural

resources themselves. Many other pressures have disrupted

the search for sustainable solutions even among those

eco-oriented communities, including the intervention of subsidies,

chemical inputs, weakening of collective institutions and more

importantly the bias in education system in favour of a particular kind of

world view.


In this conference, we tried to pool together examples and

insights from innovations tried by individuals or collectives at

grassroots level without any outside help. It was recognized

that the articulation of women's ecological knowledge is often

subdued in the arenas dominated by men. A special session on

women, water and wisdom was organized.


(You can see the draft program for the conference at:


Http://csf.colorado.edu/sristi


And a copy of the conference abstracts can be obtained by paying USD 30 in

favour of Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad and sent to Prof Anil

K. Gupta at the same address (see below). The proceedings will be brought

out soon and those interested should send their communications to

.


******************************************************************

Please visit our web site to see a pdf version of Honey Bee

newsletter on grassroots creativity and innovation (a sample copy)

and read about a related voluntary organization, SRISTI:


http://csf.colorado.edu/sristi

gopher://csf.colorado.edu/11/environment/sristi


address:


Prof Anil K Gupta

Co-ordinator, SRISTI (Society for Research and Initiatives for

Sustainable Technologies and Institutions) & Honey Bee network

c/o Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad - 380 015, India.

fax : 91-79-6427896

Phone: 6564979 (r)

407241 (ext: 4922, 4927, 4930) office

email: anilg@iimahd.ernet.in

******************************************************************


Conference Report:


Mobilizing the potential of grassroots innovators and other civil

society actors who do not just articulate problems but also

generate the solutions was the major purpose of the conference.

This potential exists in different subsets of survival strategies

of people. The six foci of the conference thus included

innovations in educational, technological and institutional

aspects of natural resource management, alongside their socio-

cultural aspects, knowledge systems, mechanisms in rewarding and

the molding of markets to accommodate creativity.


It is inevitable that such diverse range of issues should require

some common conceptual core. The conference tried to combine six

E's, i.e., ethics, environment, equity, excellence, efficiency

and education. The logo of the conference evoked our fundamental

belief and concern that women (and men) possessing tremendous

knowledge of their environment could move the world if given a

place to stand. But, we must confess that gender balance could

not be achieved in different functions of the conference. For

instance, among the key note speakers, there were only two

ladies, Ms.Elaben Bhatt of Self Employed Women Association and

Dr.Kamla Choudhury, Chairperson of Society for Promotion of

Wasteland Development. Among the chairpersons and discussant

of various sessions, there were less than one fourth women

members. Even among the innovators, only a few were women though

many more were invited.


Despite the fact that we were extremely gender sensitive, we did

goof in many respects. For instance, Ms.Elaben pointed out

during her chairperson's remarks on the inaugural day that she

had to stand on her toes to address the gathering because the

height of the podium was tailored to the convenience of men.

Soon after, of course we corrected the problem by providing a

small bench.


This self critical assessment is mentioned only to highlight that

a great deal of effort still remains to be made to mainstream the

gender sensitivity in the context of science and technology. The

conference was inaugurated by a grassroots innovator,

Shri.Amrutbhai who had developed a bullock cart which could be

tilted so as to pour the manure directly into the furrows.


Dr.I.G.Patel (former Director of London School of Economics and

Chairperson of IIMA Board), the other co-chairperson of the

inaugural session highlighted the need for micro level autonomous

innovations to influence macro level policy and structures.


The need to understand environmental and community interface in

terms of providing solutions was emphasized. Some of the

important questions raised were; Can creativity be created? What

are the rules of replication that also intermesh community

initiative at a local level with market forces? How do we shift

from a "problem solving" to a "solution augmenting" approach?;

How do we develop a policy framework linking innovation,

investment, and enterprise through a knowledge network.

One of the key initiatives launched at the conference included

Knowledge Network of civil society actors around the issue of

sustainable technologies and institutions. Earlier, a proposal

in this regard prepared by SRISTI was endorsed in an

international conference on Hunger and Poverty organized by IFAD

in November, 1995 at Brussels. Dr.Ali Assam of Knowledge View,

UK made a forceful plea for combining various communication

technologies to link grassroots innovators across language,

culture, and regional boundaries. It was recognized in the

conference which had more than seventy five grassroots innovators

from different parts of the country that most intellectual

dialogues on development have not involved the genius at

grassroots level. People's participation had become a cliche and

was often restricted to only physical or financial participation.

Everyday there was a plenary presentation by the innovators in

different languages demonstrating how much could they do without

any outsiders help. Around 500 participants from forty countries

around the world resolved to transform the ethical and economic

basis of the developmental paradigm so that the creative energy

of the knowledge rich - economically poor people could become a

fundamental building block of future changes. It was obvious

therefore that the conference rejected the terms like resource

poor while characterizing innovators as if knowledge was not a

resource or that people were poor even in this resource.


Conference also did not consider so called participatory

approaches like PRA or RRA as authentic or mutually accountable

means of building relationships with local creative communities

or individuals though a few participants did believe in these

methods.


Among many other issues that emerged were, the translations of

innovations into products; mechanisms for recognizing and

rewarding innovations; a liberal and efficient credit system for

capital formation; minimizing distortion in resource pricing;

augmentation of autonomous innovations; development of Venture

Capital Fund and legal support to small innovation, development

of INSTAR (International Network for Sustainable Technology

Application and Registration) so that intellectual property

rights of small innovators were not usurped by dominant private

or public sector forces.


Mr.P.Kotaiah, Chairperson, National Bank for Agriculture and

Rural Development, Bombay was unequivocal in his support for the

grassroots innovations and mentioned how NABARD had made a

beginning through an incubation fund for small innovations. He

recognized the need for closer linkages with local communities

and NGOs.


The policy dialogue on augmenting grassroots innovations

attracted a forceful attention of policy makers at different

levels. Union Minister of State for Science and Technology,

Dr.Y.K.Alagh stressed the need for establishing special funds for

augmenting innovations. Chief Secretary of Rajasthan and Finance

Secretary of Punjab who could not attend the conference

communicated their strong support for the idea of setting up some

kind of venture capital fund for small innovations. The Chief

Secretary of Gujarat state, Shri.S.K.Shelat announced setting up

a fund of ten million rupees for promoting innovations. A lady

from Kutch intervened during his presentation to insist that such

funds would be effective only when women would be involved as

equal partners in the process. Subsequent to the conference,

Gujarat Grassroots Innovation Augmentation Network (GIAN) has

been set up with all India coverage. It is the first such

institution that is trying to convert innovations into products

and link excellence in formal and informal sectors. In this

context the risk inherent in upscaling small innovations was

recognized and non-suitability of conventional credit and venture

capital institutions was also acknowledged. It was also

underlined that value addition in some of the local innovations

may generate opportunities at global level. Therefore, the

consumers of sustainable technologies and products need not be

always found in local context. This would also imply need for

watch dog function to be performed by voluntary organizations and

innovators networks so that they are not short changed. One

would also have to avoid a familiar consequence of globalization

which is non-sustainable extraction of local resources.


The need to create conducive socio-cultural milieu facilitating

literacy and fostering a positive approach towards innovative

ideas to enable diffusion of innovations was stressed.


A significant dimension was added by the conference relating to

erosion of knowledge vis-a-vis erosion of biodiversity and other

resources. The protection of traditional knowledge and genetic

resources in the context of law was discussed. Traditional

resource rights, grassroots rights and traditional knowhow

rights', appreciation of fundamental distinction between genetic

resources untouched and natural resources traditionally used;

dimensions of TRIPs; establishment of simple registration

systems; inter connections between TIPRs, WIPO and WTO, etc.,

were considered important in contributing to augmenting

creativity. Context- specificity of legal aspects was another

aspect of the complexity. One of the important contributions of

the conference was to draw attention to the fact that not all

knowledge was traditional, or communal in nature. The scope and

validity of contemporary innovations could not be undermined

although much of the literature on this subject has emphasized

the traditional and the communal aspect of knowledge related

rights. These were important but not sufficient.


Several presentations in the conference highlighted the

importance of non-monetary incentives for creativity. It was

strongly argued that if educational system did not undergo any

change, then long term respect and recognition of grassroots

innovation would not be possible. Incorporation of indigenous

ecological knowledge in curriculum in Canada, Vietnam, West

Indies, India, Norway, etc., was emphasized as an important

agenda for future change. The educational system as it existed

specialized in converting the knowledge rich, economically poor

people into drop outs. Both curricular and pedagogic changes

were necessary if the linkage between high biodiversity, high

poverty, low literacy, high drop out, high emigration, etc., had

to be broken. The blending of secular and the sacred

consciousness would also become necessary if local institutions

have to gain legitimacy and support.


Some of the concerns raised by the innovators were, availability

of financial support that will enable them to contribute more

efficiently in the form of as low/no interest loans and not

grant; recognition of the innovator and the innovation; linkage

with regional research laboratory for better appreciation and

direction of efforts, and institutional support mechanisms for

emergence of innovations and their market.


A public policy environment using and propagating traditional and

contemporary knowledge was considered important; to be promoted

by a specialized organization (one group referred to SRISTI -

Society for Research and Initiatives for Sustainable and

Technological Institutions - as a possible model) that will

support local initiatives. The need to change the attitude of

public functionaries towards local institutional and

technological knowledge (LITK) and its integration into

development programmes was also emphasized.


There was however, reservation in the mind of some about viewing

innovations at the "global" level and even on transfer of

knowledge. Innovations were characterized as static while

creativity appeared to be "dynamic" . In the innovation, investor

and entrepreneur link, the community dimension appeared to be

conspicuous by its absence, inclusion of which will enable

appreciation of the prevailing work linkages. On the other hand,

others argued that transfer of knowledge and technologies was

taking place all the time through global media and institutions.

Why should not the same social force and media be available to

local knowledge and innovations as well. Further, why should

global space be appropriated only by global actors (even if these

were NGOs)? Why should not local creativity grow and be nurtured

through global consumers if local consumers, because of their

colonized minds, did not pay attention to the worth of local

innovations and knowledge systems. The Convention on Biological

Diversity and Desert Convention were recalled as instruments that

could facilitate linkage between global and local institution

sand markets. Dr.Thomas Cottier of University of Berne made a

forceful plea for adopting conventional IPR regime in aid of

grassroots innovations.


The need for appreciation of local knowledge at its own terms and

recording traditional knowledge as well as contemporary

innovations through vernacular media as attempted by Honey Bee

for the benefit of current and future generations was also

underlined. A multimedia presentation of local innovations and

electronic version of Honey Bee newsletter were also displayed at

the conference apart from a herbaria of commonly used medicinal

plants.


However, as a commentator observed, a significant feature of

participatory interpretation of learning approaches exemplified

during this conference was the "striking participation of the

farmers and rural folk who are innovators, as part of their daily

life practice. Their world view is community centred and not self

oriented as the modern civilization tends to inculcate as a

predominant value. The idea of patents and making money out of

new ideas that they generate is far from their minds".


And yet how ethical it was to perpetuate a system where the most

knowledgeable herbalists in tribal as well as non-tribal villages

often were very poor. Not only that, their children as well as

other younger people did not wish to acquire this knowledge and

continue to grow it. Perhaps, the romanticization of local ethic

which was crumbling under the weight of unfair markets did not

generate new choices which could empower the local communities or

individuals. Hence, the emphasis in linking formal and informal

science to empower local knowledge systems to compete and create

new sustainable choices.


An interesting paradigm was articulated, i.e., policy change

through performance at micro level rather than only lobbying at

macro level. The need to resolve the dichotomy between `global'

and `local' approaches and scaling was highlighted along with the

need to establish dialogue between equals, recognize the threats

of commercialization, question biases in knowledge systems and

arrive at a cross-cultural definition of sustainable development.


The conference proved to be a mile stone in improving our

understanding of the institutional context in which innovations

emerge, grow or die without often becoming institutionalized

solutions or services. If technology was like words, the

institutions were like grammar (Gupta, 1990). The conference

organized by Centre for Management in Agriculture at Indian

Institute of Management, Ahmedabad demonstrated through its

deliberation, how grammar of creativity and innovation was

changing the meanings of everyday life for large number of people

around the world. If these symbols of hope were not becoming the

building blocks of entire developmental processes, it only showed

how entrenched the mediocrity and cynicism was in the body

politic of modern institutions. Otherwise, there is no reason

why when Honey Bee Network could scout thousands of innovations

around the world but particularly in India, why other civil

society organizations fail to do so. The challenge posed by the

problem solvers is not going to leave the institutions of

knowledge production and reproduction unaffected for too long.


As Manubhai Pancholi and Motibhai Chowdhary, two eminent

Gandhians mentioned in the concluding remarks, we were passing

through a period of 'sankranti', i.e., the time when two

different era or ages meet. This is the moment when the little

genius at grassroots are asserting their ethical and ecological

excellence and at the same time global markets, institutions and

mindsets are acquiring enormous power. If local creativity can

get a place to stand in our minds, it will indeed move the world.


(This report has been compiled through active assistance of many

colleagues at IIMA and SRISTI but particular mention needs to be

made of the efforts of Ms.Ria Sinha and Dr.Gopichandran. This is

not a proceeding of the conference which will be released later.)


From cwarrick@osf1.gmu.eduTue Apr 15 11:27:30 1997

Date: Thu, 27 Mar 1997 22:13:22 -0500 (EST)

From: "CYNTHIA A. WARRICK"

To: EJ-MAYORS@gmu.edu

Cc: aoec@dgs.dgsys.com, blynn@ksu.ksu.edu, carlanthony@igc.apc.org,

dglave@juno.com, dhughes@du.edu, ecojustice@igc.apc.org, ejrc@cau.edu,

ENVIRONMENT-L@cornell.edu, fjonesn@nasc.mass.edu,

g045908@jaguar1.usouthal.edu, garyentz@m.cc.utah.edu,

healtheadm@aol.com, holloran@forsythe.stanford.edu,

jrjohnson@cs.twsu.edu, loka@unix.amherst.edu, mstewart@m.cc.utah.edu,

NCOBPS@aurora.ncat.edu, njacobs@carleton.edu,

nprocto@timeshare.service.emory.edu, occ-env-med-l@list.mc.duke.edu,

race-pol@acadcomp.cmp.ilstu.edu, rcfischer@uci.edu,

rixickes@kea.lincoln.ac.nz, rrncfarl3@uh.vm.va.edu,

scishops@listserv.ncsu.edu, sdpressley@juno.com,

spritch@leland.Stanford.EDU, walkercz@oneonta.edu

Subject: The National Conference of Black Mayors EJ Conference


The National Conference of Black Mayors, The National Bar Association, and

the Howard University Urban Environment Institute present:


"The State of Environmental Justice in America"

during the 23rd Annual Convention of the NCBM, April 25-26, 1997

River Regalfront Hotel, St. Louis, Missouri


Thursday, 4/24/97

8am - 6pm Registration

7pm - 9pm Mayors Opening Reception- City of St.Louis


Friday, 4/25/97

8am - 12noon Registration

8am - 3:30pm Exhibit Hall Opens


9am - 10:30am Opening Plenary Session

"The State of Environmental Justice in America"

Welcome: Mayor Emanuel Cleaver, II, President NCBM

Mayor David Humes, NCBM Env. Committee Chair

Introductions: Dennis Gramms, Region 7 EPA Administrator

Opening Remarks: Carol Browner, EPA Administrator

Keynote Address: "Ten Years Since Toxic Waste & Race" - Elliott Laws,

Patton & Boggs, Wash.DC


10:45am - 12:15pm Federal Agency Reports: Actions taken since the

Exec.Order 12898

Moderator: Mayor Robert B. Ingram, Ph.D., Opa-locka, FL

Federal Panel: DOE - Corlis Moody, Director Economic Impact & Diversity

HUD - Deputy Secretary Dwight Robinson

DOD - Deputy Under Secretary Sherri Goodman

EJ Response Panel:

Rev. Buck Jones, Project Hope, East St. Louis, IL

Gloria Thurman, Anacostia/Congress Heighst Partnership

Ben F. Wilson, Esq., National Bar Association


12:30pm - 2:30pm Presidents Luncheon


3pm - 4:30pm Concurrent Workshops

Workshop A - The Law & Environmental Justice

Moderator: John Rosenthal, Urban Env. Institute

Panelists: Lois J. Schiffer, Asst. Attorney General, Dept. of Justice

Hilda V. Gurley, National Bar Association

Daniel R. Mandelker, Washington University School of Law


Workshop B - Industry & Environmental Justice

Moderator: Robin Morris Collin, Univ. of Oregon School of Law

Panelists: Steve Herman, US EPA Office of Enforcement

Major Michael Corbin, US Dept. of the Army

Donelle Wilkins, WARM Training, Detroit, Michigan

Clydia J. Cuykendall, Star Enterprise, Houston, TX


7pm - 9pm Welcome to East St. Louis Reception

9:30pm - 11pm Cruise Aboard the Casino Queen


Saturday, 4/26/97

8am - 10:30am Mayors Prayer Breakfast

10:45am - 12:30pm Concurrent Workshops

Workshop C - The Community & Env. Justice

Moderator: Eric W. Wilson, Fulton County of Env. Affairs

Panelists: Otis Jones, USDA Forest Service

Keith Miller, Monsanto Corp.

Alandra Byrd, New Spirit Neighborhood, East St. Louis


Workshop D - Public Health and Env. Justice

Moderator: Carolyn Bell, Community Health Resources, Memphis, TN

Dr. Rueben C. Warren, Assoc. Admin. Urban Affairs, ATSDR

Cynthia Warrick, Urban Env. Institute

Dr. Jessie L. Sherrod, National Medical Association


Lunch Break


1:30pm - 3:00pm NCBM Town Hall Meeting

1:30pm - 3:30pm International Environmental Justice Forum

Moderator: Peter Sam, African Environmental & Consulting Group

Panelists: Honorable Johnny Ford, World Conference of Mayors

Dr. Hilary I. Inyang, Univ. of Mass. Lowell

David Hales, USAID Global Env. Center

Lauri J. Fitz-Pegado, US Dept. of Commerce


1:30pm - 4pm HBCU EJ Grant-Writing Workshop

Moderator: John Rosenthall, Urban Env. Institute

Robert Knox - EPA Env. Justice Dept.

Malika Hobbs - Department of Energy


4pm - 4:45pm Final Session

Dr. Warren Banks - Workshop Summaries/Action Plan

NCBM Closing Remarks


7pm - 7:45pm NCBM Reception


8pm - 10:30pm "Tribute to a Black American" Dinner


Transportation

Delta Airlines is the Official Carrier of the NCBM 23rd Annual Convention.

Special Convention Rates of 5% Discount off published domestic fares, and

10% Discount off the unrestricted Coach Y06/YR06 fare (except travel on

Delta Express flights). To take advantage of either discount:

Call Delta at 1-800-241-6760, 8am - 11pm.

Refer to File number: XA888

Certain Restrictions may apply and seats are limited.


Hotel Accomodations

Hotel reservations can be made at the Headquarters Hotel, The Regal

Riverfront Hotel. Identify yourself as an attendee at NCBM's Convention

and Secure special discounted rates as follows:


River Regalfront Hotel

200 South 4th Street Room Rate: $105.00 (single or double)

St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 241-9500 or 1-800-325-7353


National Conference of Black Mayors, Inc.

Environmental Justice Registration


Name_____________________________________________


Title____________________________________________


Organization_____________________________________


Address__________________________________________


City___________________ State______________Zip_________


Phone ( )______________ FAX ( )_________________


EJ Conference registration includes the Mayors Receptions on Thursday and

Friday. Fees for Meal Functions are Additional. Registration for the

23rd Annual Convention includes registration for the EJ Conference and all

meals.


Fees: Pre-Registration (by 4/9) On-Site Registration Total


Mayors

Convention $400 $450


EJ Conference

General Reg. $200 $250


Government $175 $200


Non-Profit $100 $100


HBCU $ 75 $ 75


Presidents Lunch $50


Prayer Breakfast $35


Tribute Dinner $75


Method of Payment:


Check/Money Order/Purchase Order No:__________ Total Amount Paid$_____


Credit Card: MC_______ VISA_______ Diner's Club_______ AMEX________


Card Number:_______________________________Expiration Date:____________


Signature:____________________________________________________________


Please make check or money order payable to:


National Conferece of Black Mayors, Inc.

1422 West Peachtree Street, N.W., Suite 800

Atlanta, GA 30309

(404) 892-0127 (404) 876-4597 FAX


Conference Materials and tickets will be distributed at the registration

desk, beginning April 23rd. All Pre-registrations must be post-marked by

April 9th. After that date, please register by telephone or fax.

Cancellation Policy: No refunds after April 9, 1997.


The National Bar Association is co-sponsoring this conference. This

conference qualifies for continuing legal education credits. The NBA

certifies that this activity conforms to the standards for an approved

education activity in states requiring CLE. Certification for 7.0 and 8.2

hours of CLE credits (based on 60/50minute rule) is recommended. The NBA

is an accredited sponsor of CLE.


For additional information contact:


Cynthia Warrick

Conference Coordinator

HU Urban Environment Institute

(301) 585-2295

(301) 585-8911

cwarrick@gmu.edu


From cwarrick@osf1.gmu.eduTue Apr 15 11:27:57 1997

Date: Thu, 27 Mar 1997 22:27:45 -0500

From: "CYNTHIA A. WARRICK"

Reply to: scishops@listserv.ncsu.edu

To: Multiple recipients of list

Subject: The National Conference of Black Mayors EJ Conference


The National Conference of Black Mayors, The National Bar Association, and

the Howard University Urban Environment Institute present:


"The State of Environmental Justice in America"

during the 23rd Annual Convention of the NCBM, April 25-26, 1997

River Regalfront Hotel, St. Louis, Missouri


Thursday, 4/24/97

8am - 6pm Registration

7pm - 9pm Mayors Opening Reception- City of St.Louis


Friday, 4/25/97

8am - 12noon Registration

8am - 3:30pm Exhibit Hall Opens


9am - 10:30am Opening Plenary Session

"The State of Environmental Justice in America"

Welcome: Mayor Emanuel Cleaver, II, President NCBM

Mayor David Humes, NCBM Env. Committee Chair

Introductions: Dennis Gramms, Region 7 EPA Administrator

Opening Remarks: Carol Browner, EPA Administrator

Keynote Address: "Ten Years Since Toxic Waste & Race" - Elliott Laws,

Patton & Boggs, Wash.DC


10:45am - 12:15pm Federal Agency Reports: Actions taken since the

Exec.Order 12898

Moderator: Mayor Robert B. Ingram, Ph.D., Opa-locka, FL

Federal Panel: DOE - Corlis Moody, Director Economic Impact & Diversity

HUD - Deputy Secretary Dwight Robinson

DOD - Deputy Under Secretary Sherri Goodman

EJ Response Panel:

Rev. Buck Jones, Project Hope, East St. Louis, IL

Gloria Thurman, Anacostia/Congress Heighst Partnership

Ben F. Wilson, Esq., National Bar Association


12:30pm - 2:30pm Presidents Luncheon


3pm - 4:30pm Concurrent Workshops

Workshop A - The Law & Environmental Justice

Moderator: John Rosenthal, Urban Env. Institute

Panelists: Lois J. Schiffer, Asst. Attorney General, Dept. of Justice

Hilda V. Gurley, National Bar Association

Daniel R. Mandelker, Washington University School of Law


Workshop B - Industry & Environmental Justice

Moderator: Robin Morris Collin, Univ. of Oregon School of Law

Panelists: Steve Herman, US EPA Office of Enforcement

Major Michael Corbin, US Dept. of the Army

Donelle Wilkins, WARM Training, Detroit, Michigan

Clydia J. Cuykendall, Star Enterprise, Houston, TX


7pm - 9pm Welcome to East St. Louis Reception

9:30pm - 11pm Cruise Aboard the Casino Queen


Saturday, 4/26/97

8am - 10:30am Mayors Prayer Breakfast

10:45am - 12:30pm Concurrent Workshops

Workshop C - The Community & Env. Justice

Moderator: Eric W. Wilson, Fulton County of Env. Affairs

Panelists: Otis Jones, USDA Forest Service

Keith Miller, Monsanto Corp.

Alandra Byrd, New Spirit Neighborhood, East St. Louis


Workshop D - Public Health and Env. Justice

Moderator: Carolyn Bell, Community Health Resources, Memphis, TN

Dr. Rueben C. Warren, Assoc. Admin. Urban Affairs, ATSDR

Cynthia Warrick, Urban Env. Institute

Dr. Jessie L. Sherrod, National Medical Association


Lunch Break


1:30pm - 3:00pm NCBM Town Hall Meeting

1:30pm - 3:30pm International Environmental Justice Forum

Moderator: Peter Sam, African Environmental & Consulting Group

Panelists: Honorable Johnny Ford, World Conference of Mayors

Dr. Hilary I. Inyang, Univ. of Mass. Lowell

David Hales, USAID Global Env. Center

Lauri J. Fitz-Pegado, US Dept. of Commerce


1:30pm - 4pm HBCU EJ Grant-Writing Workshop

Moderator: John Rosenthall, Urban Env. Institute

Robert Knox - EPA Env. Justice Dept.

Malika Hobbs - Department of Energy


4pm - 4:45pm Final Session

Dr. Warren Banks - Workshop Summaries/Action Plan

NCBM Closing Remarks


7pm - 7:45pm NCBM Reception


8pm - 10:30pm "Tribute to a Black American" Dinner


Transportation

Delta Airlines is the Official Carrier of the NCBM 23rd Annual Convention.

Special Convention Rates of 5% Discount off published domestic fares, and

10% Discount off the unrestricted Coach Y06/YR06 fare (except travel on

Delta Express flights). To take advantage of either discount:

Call Delta at 1-800-241-6760, 8am - 11pm.

Refer to File number: XA888

Certain Restrictions may apply and seats are limited.


Hotel Accomodations

Hotel reservations can be made at the Headquarters Hotel, The Regal

Riverfront Hotel. Identify yourself as an attendee at NCBM's Convention

and Secure special discounted rates as follows:


River Regalfront Hotel

200 South 4th Street Room Rate: $105.00 (single or double)

St. Louis, MO 63102

(314) 241-9500 or 1-800-325-7353


National Conference of Black Mayors, Inc.

Environmental Justice Registration


Name_____________________________________________


Title____________________________________________


Organization_____________________________________


Address__________________________________________


City___________________ State______________Zip_________


Phone ( )______________ FAX ( )_________________


EJ Conference registration includes the Mayors Receptions on Thursday and

Friday. Fees for Meal Functions are Additional. Registration for the

23rd Annual Convention includes registration for the EJ Conference and all

meals.


Fees: Pre-Registration (by 4/9) On-Site Registration Total


Mayors

Convention $400 $450


EJ Conference

General Reg. $200 $250


Government $175 $200


Non-Profit $100 $100


HBCU $ 75 $ 75


Presidents Lunch $50


Prayer Breakfast $35


Tribute Dinner $75


Method of Payment:


Check/Money Order/Purchase Order No:__________ Total Amount Paid$_____


Credit Card: MC_______ VISA_______ Diner's Club_______ AMEX________


Card Number:_______________________________Expiration Date:____________


Signature:____________________________________________________________


Please make check or money order payable to:


National Conferece of Black Mayors, Inc.

1422 West Peachtree Street, N.W., Suite 800

Atlanta, GA 30309

(404) 892-0127 (404) 876-4597 FAX


Conference Materials and tickets will be distributed at the registration

desk, beginning April 23rd. All Pre-registrations must be post-marked by

April 9th. After that date, please register by telephone or fax.

Cancellation Policy: No refunds after April 9, 1997.


The National Bar Association is co-sponsoring this conference. This

conference qualifies for continuing legal education credits. The NBA

certifies that this activity conforms to the standards for an approved

education activity in states requiring CLE. Certification for 7.0 and 8.2

hours of CLE credits (based on 60/50minute rule) is recommended. The NBA

is an accredited sponsor of CLE.


For additional information contact:


Cynthia Warrick

Conference Coordinator

HU Urban Environment Institute

(301) 585-2295

(301) 585-8911

cwarrick@gmu.edu


From astingsh@ksu.eduTue Apr 15 11:28:34 1997

Date: Fri, 28 Mar 1997 16:02:54 -0500

From: kerry miller

Reply to: scishops@listserv.ncsu.edu

To: Multiple recipients of list

Subject: Re: EARTHDAY (fwd)


>Date: Wed, 26 Mar 1997 21:59:46 -0500

>Sender: Green School List

>From: Mitchell Gold

>Subject: Re: EARTHDAY

>To: Multiple recipients of list GRNSCH-L

>

>>

>

>Earth Day!

>

>What is Earth Day?

>

>I have just arrived from another galaxy and I find it strange that you

>people on this planet have an "earth day". What is it in this day that

>you find so interesting? Why is it different from the other days you

>have created names for?

>

>I can understand United Nations Day because that is something that you

>created in order to have an orderly world. I can understand that you

>have an International Peace Day and an International Day for Families.

>These are all human constructions to sustain order on your planet.

>

>Do you celebrate the "day"? or the Earth? Is it really a 24 hour

>experience? It also seems strange to me that the picture that you use to

>promote this day is over twenty years old, taken by one of your

>primitive NASA ships. Is it not strange that there are not more recent

>pictures? Why are they being hidden? And who is hiding them?

>

>Life where I come from is not so complicated. We learned that everything

>is interconnected, interrelated and interdependant. We did not have to

>teach the elders this information, they teach it to us. They taught us

>other important lessons that your elders seem to have misplaced.

> We learned that it was important to learn how to make peace. You have a

>strange job function on your "earth". It is called "peace keeping".

>Would it not be easier to make peace than to try and "keep " it. You

>cannot keep peace. It is not a static enterprise. It is an activity that

>you enjoy. True, it does require some characteristics that you humans

>have little time for. Several come to mind: trust, joy , responsibility,

>courage, love. These words have so many meanings to you they become

>confusing. They are simple notions that should be part of your early

>childhood training. But alas they are not.

>

>Maybe the answer lies in how you look at energy and all the differnet

>kinds of energy. Most important - human energy. How will you ever

>find out? There is an experience called breathing that you have not

>learned to do yet. You think that because you are alive it is not

>necessary to learn how to breathe. A foolish thought that is.

>

>Enough complaining. I am starting to talk like you already.

>

>Perhaps on this day you call "earth" day, you were might not read your

>newspapers or watch that thing called television. Call it a media fast.

>Go next door to visit with your neighbour. Take them a gift. It does not

>matter what the gift is. It should be a gift from your heart. It could

>be a simple thing like a penny. . "I found this on the street to-day and

>I wanted to bring it to you for good luck." Sit and talk for awhile.

>Have a drink of cold clean water and toast each others good health and

>happiness.

>

>Now, that would be an "earth" day. Imagine.

>

>

>Mitchell Gold

>

>IPC 2000 Project

>

>

> o#'9MMHb':'-,o,

> .oH":HH$' "' ' -*R&o,

> dMMM*""'`' .oM"HM?.

> ,MMM' "HLbd< ?&H\

> .:MH ."\ ` MM MM&b

> . "*H - &MMMMMMMMMH:

> . dboo MMMMMMMMMMMM.

> . dMMMMMMb *MMMMMMMMMP.

> . MMMMMMMP *MMMMMP .

> `#MMMMM MM6P ,

> ' `MMMP" HM*`,

> ' :MM .- ,

> '. `#?.. . ..'

> -. . .-

> ''-.oo,oo.-''

>

>

>International Association of Educators for World Peace

>International Peace City 2000

>

>

> Home Planet Alliance

> 2 Bloor St. West

> Suite 100-209

> Toronto, Ontario, Canada

> M4W 3E2

>

> Tel 416-924-4449

> Fax 416-924-4094

> e-mail: homeplanet@homeplanet.org

>


James Cahillane

University of Chicago

Office of Resource Conservation

recycle@uchicago.edu

773.702.3415

fax: 773.702.3340


*****************************************************

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Visit the University of Chicago Environmental Center!

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