Chapter 1: introduction: articles




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SYLLABUS

INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY


Instructor: Office Hours:

School: Location:

Semester, Year: e-mail:


Required Text:

Frank E. Hagan (2008). Introduction to Criminology, 6th edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publishing.


Recommended Readings:

The recommended readings are grouped by chapters in the textbook and can be accessed on the student study Web site, www.sagepub.com/HaganStudy. Each article is online and can be obtained by clicking on it.

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION: ARTICLES

  • Geis, G. (1990). “Crime and Criminal Justice: Where Have We Been, Where Are We Going?” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 12 (6): 254-263.

  • Katz, J. (2004). “On Rhetoric and the Politics of Ethnographic Methodology.” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 595 (9): 280-318.

  • Post, Mezey, Maxwell, and Morales (2002). “The Rape Tax: Tangible and Intangible Costs of Sexual Violence.” Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 17 (7): 773-782.

  • Yanich, D. (2005). “Kids, Crime and Local Television News.” Crime and Delinquency, 51 (1): 103-132.


CHAPTER 2: RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINOLOGY: ARTICLES

  • Dobash, E., and Dobash, R. (2000). “Evaluating Criminal Justice Interventions for Domestic Violence.” Crime and Delinquency, 46 (2): 252-270.

  • Dowden, C., and Andrews, D.A. (1999). “What Works for Female Offenders: A Meta-Analytic Review.” Crime and Delinquency, 45 (5): 438-452.

  • Martel, J. (2004). “Policing Criminological Knowledge: The Hazards of Qualitative Research on Women in Prison.” Theoretical Criminology, 8: 157-189.

  • Surette, R. (2002). “Self-Reported Copycat Crime Among a Population of Serious and Violent Juvenile Offenders.” Crime and Delinquency, 48 (1): 46-69.


CHAPTER 3: GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CRIME AND CRIMINALS: ARTICLES


  • Bond-Maupin, L. (1998). “That Wasn’t Even Me They Showed: Women as Criminals on America’s Most Wanted.” Violence Against Women, 4 (2): 30-44.

  • Eisner, M., and Killias, M. (2004). “Switzerland.” European Journal of Criminology, 4 (1): 257-293.

  • Matthews, R., Maume, M., and Miller, W. (201). “Deindustrialization, Economic Distress and Homicide Rates in Midsized Rustbelt Cities.” Homicide Studies, 5 (5): 83-113.

  • Sampson, R. (1985). “Race and Criminal Violence.” Crime and Delinquency, 31 (1): 47-82.


CHAPTER 4: EARLY AND CLASSICAL THEORIES: ARTICLES

  • Dicristina, B. (2004). “Durkheim’s Theory of Homicide and the Confusion of the Empirical Literature.” Theoretical Criminology, 8 (1): 57-91.

  • Gibson, M. (1982). “The ‘Female Offender’ and the Italian School of Criminal Anthropology.” Journal of European Studies, 12 (9): 155-165.

  • Mcara, L., and Mcvie, S. (2005). “The Usual Suspects?: Street-life, Young People and the Police.” Criminal Justice, 5 (2): 5-36.

  • Myers, M. (2000). “Toward Theoretical Integration.” Theoretical Criminology, 4: 224-225.


CHAPTER 5: POSITIVISTIC THEORIES: BIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL: ARTICLES


  • Arrigo, B. (2003). “Justice and the Deconstruction of Psychological Jurisprudence: The Case of Competency to Stand Trial.” Theoretical Criminology, 7: 55-88.

  • Ellis, L. (2005). “A Theory Explaining Biological Correlates of Criminality.” European Journal of Criminology, 2 (2): 287-315.

  • Kocsis, R. (2003). “Criminal Psychological Profiling: Validities and Abilities.” International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 47 (April): 126-144.

  • Nelson, S. (1974). “Review Section: Nature/Nurture Revisited: A Review of the Biological Bases of Conflict.” Journal of Conflict Resolution, 18 (6): 285-335.


CHAPTER 6: SOCIOLOGICAL MAINSTREAM THEORIES: ARTICLES

  • DeLi, S., and MacKenzie, D.L. (2003). “The Gendered Effects of Adult Social Bonds on the Criminal Activities of Probationers.” Criminal Justice Review, 28 (9): 278-298.

  • Geis, G. (2000). “On the Absence of Self-Control as the Basis for a General Theory of Crime: A Critique.” Theoretical Criminology, 4 (1): 35-53.

  • Kazemian, L., and LeBlanc, M. (2004). “Exploring Patterns of Perpetration of Crime Across the Life Course: Offense and Offender-Based Viewpoints.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 20 (11): 393-415.

  • Mustaine, E., and Tewksbury, R. (1999). “A Routine Activity Theory Explanation for Women’s Stalking Victimization.” Violence Against Women, 5 (1): 43-62.


CHAPTER 7: SOCIOLOGICAL CRITICAL THEORIES AND INTEGRATED THEORIES: ARTICLES


  • Coffee, S. (2002). “Folk Devils and Moral Panics: ‘Left Realism’ Reconsidered.” Crime, Media and Culture, 6: 387-410.

  • Lemley, E. (2001). “Designing Restorative Justice Policy: An Analytical Perspective.” Criminal Justice Policy Review, 12 (3): 43-65.

  • Messerschmidt, J. (1999). “Making Bodies Matter: Adolescent Masculinities, the Body, and Varieties of Violence.” Theoretical Criminology, 3 (May): 197-220.

  • Wozniak, J. (2002). “Toward a Theoretical Model of Peacemaking Criminology: An Essay in Honor of Richard Quinney.” Crime and Delinquency, 48 (4): 204-231.


CHAPTER 8: VIOLENT CRIME: ARTICLES


  • Bruce, M., Roscigno, V., and McCall, P. (1998). “Structure, Context and Agency in the Reproduction of Black-on-Black Violence.” Theoretical Criminology, 2 (1): 29-55.

  • Hagedorn, J. (2005). “The Global Impact of Gangs.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 21 (2): 153-169.

  • Holmes, S., Tewksbury, R., and Holmes, R. (1999). “Fractured Identity Syndrome: A New Theory of Serial Murder.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 15 (8): 262-276.

  • Klein, J. (2006). “An Invisible Problem: Everyday Violence Against Girls in School.” Theoretical Criminology, 10 (May): 147-177.


CHAPTER 9: PROPERTY CRIME: OCCASIONAL, CONVENTIONAL AND PROFESSIONAL: ARTICLES


  • Gottfredson, D., and Soule, D. (2005). “The Timing of Property Crime, Violent Crime and Substance Abuse Among Juveniles.” Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 42 (2): 110-120.

  • Kearon, T., and Leach, R. (2000). “Invasion of the ‘Body Snatchers’: Burglary Reconsidered.” Theoretical Criminology, 4: 451-472.

  • Mendes, S. (2000). “Property Crime and Drug Enforcement in Portugal.” Criminal Justice Policy Review, 11 (9): 195-216.

  • Potchak, M., McGloun, J., and Zgoba, K. (2000). “A Spatial Analysis of Criminal Effort: Auto Theft in Newark, New Jersey.” Criminal Justice Policy Review, 13 (9): 257-285.


CHAPTER 10: WHITE COLLAR CRIME: OCCUPATIONAL AND CORPORATE: ARTICLES


  • Friedrichs, D. (2002). “Occupational Crime, Occupational Deviance and Workplace Crime.” Criminal Justice, 2 (3): 243-256.

  • Gerber, J., and Jensen, E. (2000). “Controlling Transnational Corporations.” International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 44 (6): 692-678.

  • Kramer, R. (1984). “Is Corporate Crime Serious Crime?: Criminal Justice and Corporate Crime Control.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 2 (6): 7-10.

  • Ruggiero, M., Greenberger, E., and Steinberg, L. (1982). “Occupational Deviance Among Adolescent Workers.” Youth and Society, 13 (6): 423-445.


CHAPTER 11: POLITICAL CRIME: ARTICLES


  • Albini, J. (2001). “Dealing with the Modern Terrorist: The Need for Changes in Strategies and Tactics in the New War on Terrorism.” Criminal Justice Policy Review, 12 (12): 255-281.

  • Bibes, P. (2001). “Transnational Organized Crime and Terrorism: Colombia, a Case Study.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 17: 243-258.

  • Hamm, M. (2004). “Apocalyptic Violence: The Seduction of Terrorist Subcultures.” Theoretical Criminology, 8: 323-339.

  • Shelley, L. (1989). “Human Rights as an International Issue.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 506 (11): 42-52.


CHAPTER 12: ORGANIZED CRIME: ARTICLES


  • Hagan, F. (1983). “The Organized Crime Continuum: A Further Specification of a New Conceptual Model.” Criminal Justice Review, 8 (9): 52-57.

  • Lombardo, R. (2002). “The Black Hand: Terror by Letter in Chicago.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 18 (11): 394-409.

  • Smith, D. (1980). “Paragons, Pariahs and Pirates: A Spectrum-Based Theory of Enterprise.” Crime and Delinquency, 26 (7):: 358-396.

  • Sung, H. (2004). “State Failure, Economic Failure, and Predatory Organized Crime: A Comparative Analysis.” Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 41 (5): 111-129.


CHAPTER 13: PUBLIC ORDER CRIME: ARTICLES


  • Bernstein, E. (2001). “The Meaning of Purchase: Desire, Demand and the Commerce of Sex.” Ethnography, 2: 389-429.

  • Miethe, T., Olson, J., and Mitchell, O. (2006). “Specialization and Persistence in the Arrest Histories of Sex Offenders: A Comparative Analysis of Alternative Measures and Offense Types.” Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 43 (8): 204-229.

  • Williamson, C., and Cluse-Tolar, T. (2002). “Pimp-Controlled Prostitution.” Violence Against Women, 8 (9): 1074-1092.

  • Zgoba, K., and Simon, L. (2005). “Recidivism Rate of Sexual Offenders Up to 7 Years Later: Does Treatment Matter?” Criminal Justice Review, 30 (9): 155-173.


CHAPTER 14: THE AMERICAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM: ARTICLES


  • Braga, A. (2001). “The Effects of Hot Spots Policing on Crime.” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, 578 (November): 104-125.

  • MacKenzie, D. (2000). “Evidence-Based Corrections: Identifying What Works.” Theoretical Criminology, 46 (October): 457-471.

  • Yili, X., Fiedler, M., and Flaming, K. (2005). “Discovering the Impact of Community Policing: The Broken Windows Thesis, Collective Efficacy and Citizens’ Judgment.” Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 42 (5): 147-186.

  • Zhang, S., Roberts, E., and Callanan, V. (2006). “Preventing Parolees from Returning to Prison through Community-Based Reintegration.” Crime and Delinquency, 52 (10): 551-571.


Goals:

The goal of this course is to make the student a more informed critic and analyst of the world of crime and criminology. It is hoped that by the end of the course you will be better able to explain why crime takes place (theories), where we get data on crime (methods), and better analyze the various types of crime. As a student of criminology, you should develop the ability to better interpret the changing world of crime, become a more informed citizen, and be better prepared to enter the world of professional criminology and criminal justice.


Course Requirements:

5 tests = 60 percent of grade

1 10-page term paper on a specific area of criminal behavior = 30 percent of grade

Attendance, class participation = 10 percent of grade


Grading Scale:

A = 90+

B+ = 85-89

B = 80-84

C+ = 75-79

C = 70-74

D+ = 65-69

D = 60-64

F = -59


Chronology of Syllabus Readings/Presentations:

* All readings are available on student Web site (www.sagepub.com/HaganStudy and are recommended.


Topic Readings

1. Introduction to Criminology Hagan, Chapter 1,

Geis, Katz, Post, Yanich

2. Research Methods in Criminology Hagan Chapter 2,

Dobash, Dowden, Martel, Surette


3. General Characteristics of Crime Hagan Chapter 3,

and Criminals Bond-Maupin, Eisner, Matthews, Sampson


4. Early and Classical Theories Hagan Chapter 4,

DiCristina, Gobson, Mcara, Myers


5. Positivistic Theories: Hagan Chapter 5,

Biological and Psychological Arrigo, Ellis, Kocsis, Nelson


6. Sociological Mainstream Theories Hagan Chapter 6,

DeLi, Geis, Kazemian, Mustaine


7. Sociological Critical and Hagan Chapter 7,

Integrated Theories Coffee, Lemley, Messerschmidt,

Wozniak


8. Violent Crime Hagan Chapter 8

Bruce, Hagedorn, Holmes, Klein


9. Property Crime: Occasional, Hagan Chapter 9

Conventional and Professional Gottfredson, Kearon, Mendes,

Potchak


10. White Collar Crime: Hagan Chapter 10

Occupational and Corporate Friedrichs, Gerber, Kramer,

Ruggiero


11. Political Crime Hagan Chapter 11,

Albini, Bibes, Hamm, Shelley


12. Organized Crime Hagan Chapter 12,

Hagan, Lombardo, Smith, Sung


13. Public Order Crime Hagan Chapter 13,

Bernstein, Miethe, Williamson,

Zgoba


14. The American Criminal Justice Hagan Chapter 14,

System Braga, MacKenzie, Yili, Zhang


*In the case of multiple authors of an article, only the first author was listed in the syllabus reading list.

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