Savage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture




НазваниеSavage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture
страница1/59
Дата14.10.2012
Размер1.53 Mb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   59
SAVAGE SOCIETY: DECODING THE ENIGMA OF AMERICA’S HIDDEN CULTURE

MARTHA ROSE CROW, M.S.


CHAPTER SIXTEEN


VIOLENCE, INC.:

METHODS OF CONTROL BY COERCION AND CORRUPTION


America is, by far, the most violent country in the world when measured against comparable, industrialized nations. Violence is deeply rooted in our society and has become woven into the fabric of the American lifestyle. A culture of violence has emerged that invades our lives at every level, from our most intimate relationships at home to our school and work environments. For many of us, violence has become an acceptable strategy for solving conflict, exerting power and control, obtaining possessions, and satisfying emotional desires. Moreover, violence has itself become entertainment, glamorized in the behavior of both real and fantasy heroes.

Violence: A Report from the Attorney General’s Office of California

(http://www.sayno.com/violence.html)


Violence

­

The American culture of violence causes anxiety, desensitizes the villagers to the pain of others and devalues life.

­

Violence has usually been the primary method by which political-economic power has been amassed, whether the violence was/is against fellow humans or the environment.

­

A System for Control Based On Individual "Freedom"

­

The idea of a system for control based on individual "freedom" would have seemed totally contradictory in the seventeenth century. Nicolo Machiavelli thought that control was needed and that liberty was definitely not the way to exert it.

­

He and his contemporaries' concept of control was that of the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations: totalitarian state control. In Athens, Socrates was condemned to death for "corrupting the youth" with his ideas. Athenian legislators who were suspected of "dishonorable acts" were subjected to the "scrutiny of orators," an inquiry that could lead to a ban on further speaking in the assembly or courts. In Rome, the government relied on their census. The censor used this census to oversee everyone's morals and behavior.

­

The first recorded case of suppression of a theatrical performance occurred in this empire when the comic poet Naevius was convicted of slander for poking fun at public officials. This type of control kept the Roman Empire alive for more than half a millennium. After the fall of the Empire in the third century AD, similar methods of control were adopted by the medieval states.

­

The most notable censorship of the Middle Ages was by church authorities seeking to stamp out heresy. The Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 proscribed the works of Aristotle; the Council of Trent in 1564 established the Index of Forbidden Books, which lasted for centuries; and in 1633, Galileo was forced by the Inquisition to disavow his Copernican belief that the Earth was not the center of the universe.

­

In the early eighteenth century, philosophers integrated and continued the work of the great seventeenth century pioneers who had developed fruitful methods of rational and empirical inquiry. People were now against restrictions on ideas; the understanding of human nature was one that emphasized the right to human expression and free thought.

­

"Enlightened" thinkers like Voltaire admired the freedom found in England and opposed the intolerance of the established Christian churches of their day. They also opposed the intolerance the European governments that suppressed dissenting thoughts. The two major systems were now antagonistic of each other: the old state-controlled system and the new "liberal" system. Control existed over both societies, but the methods of applying it were different: one was direct and the other was indirect.

­

The indirect method of control emerged in a period in which philosophers, political thinkers and artists responded with strength to the forces of liberalism. The enlightened period was characteristic of laissez-faire philosophies and of a continuous search for knowledge. It

was in this period when governments with educated and more or less homogeneous societies, already alienated by previous direct control of the common held notions of the world, found themselves obligated to eliminate the restraints over the ideas and the press.

­

They believed that there was no threat to the status quo, however, because the alienated societies were to restrain themselves, organizing family and community structures to exert

the control. This new family and community structure was great: the actual situation would not change because the restraints formerly posed by the state were now turned into taboos by society.

­

Governments did not need a "censor" anymore because society was its own censor. Furthermore, these taboos would be inherited by future generations due to the rich familiar tradition instated in these countries. The control was still there, but it was not maintained by the government.

­

People now had the freedom to explore new ideas, but they would not apply them because of

their alienation. Furthermore, the state-controlled educational system was a reinforcement on this control, alienating children, advising them on what to do and read and on how to think.

­

Thus the educational systems of these countries strived to "educate" all of their population, resulting on very high literacy rates and "well" educated societies. The rulers were now only able to keep their people happy by letting them know how free they were to do anything they wanted.

­

The most predominant example of one of these "free" countries in Europe was the country from which most of the system of the United States derived: England. The early English colonies in the United States were extremely homogeneous: only certain kinds of people came to America. This acted as a kind of filter, making the standards of society narrower, the common held ideal more common and the taboos stronger.

­

The Puritan ethics of the new American society enabled the state to give even more freedom to the citizens. Thus the First Amendment. The same methods for control used by England were adopted by the United States resulting, also, in a high literacy rate and a "well-educated" society. Here, too, the educational system has been a way of alienating the youth, and maintaining the status quo.

­

This education of the American public, however, has not been thorough. Most Americans are

only "functionally" literate and achieve only the minimal competency. The common person learns how to read but not how to analyze or prioritize what he reads. Conveniently enough, the media is the primary source of quick facts and common knowledge for most Americans.

­

Thus, members of this "free" society" have acquired most of the information about events and personalities through the media, with no possibility of independent check against their own observation or experience. This dependence has made the public a plastic to be molded by the masters of the media into almost any form they have desired.

­

The free and independent citizen beloved of the democratic theorist has become an automaton actuated by impulses transmitted by anonymous rulers through the system of communication.

­

Books, journals, magazines, comics, and, most recently, electronic text are all playing major roles in this molding of society. As in World War II Germany, where the public was inundated with books and pamphlets suggesting anti Semitism and respect to the Fuhrer, The American public is presented everyday with millions of pieces suggesting various controlled opinions and slogans.

­

The anonymous rulers of the media take advantage of the fact that most Americans prefer to just have a ready-made opinion because it is easier, plus Americans are trained to be lazy in this way. The mysterious rulers of the press also know that propaganda is the most widely used type of verbal manipulative strategy in our society. This is how the masters of the media exert control over society: they offer opinions as experts, "intellectuals," as columnists, or as commentators. Even humor is used as a common manipulative strategy.

­

This control also relies on the power exerted by the people themselves. Even if the press or the TV cannot reach everybody, they do reach some people. In this case, the informed crowd exerts influence over the individual because it provides information that he feels she does not have. Many people watch what others do or say to get our information.

­

It all boils down to keeping some of the population alienated by the media and the rest

partially uninformed. This is what seems to have happened throughout the last century because this is how it worked (Behaved), this was the Outcome and the elite Benefitted.

­

This model of indirect control in the United States has created a very peculiar society that is what the state wants and continues to want. The philosophy behind this control (by the rulers) is that it is only exerted for the "public good." Without this control, the United States would have never been as powerful as it is.

­

Explanation of Division of Methods and Messages of Coercion and Control

­

Social messages and propaganda are usually devised and controlled through methods, messages and methods that are also heavy with messages. Some of these things are so interrelated that it is almost impossible to separate into categories.

­

In this chapter, methods of coercion and control are explored. Sometimes, it was hard to determine which was more a method than a message and vice versa. This chapter and its subsequent one are beginning lists. Truthfully, each need their own book.

­

Sometimes I would run out of ideas for both lists and then I'd watch American television programs, start seeing the American flags and then I would see the other message and/or method symbols right away. Other times, after I told other Americans that I was making these two lists, they would remind me of methods and messages that I had totally forgotten.

­

Little and Big Methods-They All Add Up to a Perfect Patriarchal Police State

­

So many little and big ways they manipulate us. So many tiny puppet strings to serve us up to the elite males of the system. Small methods, big methods. They all add up for perfect patriarchal rule by controlled anarchy and force (patriarchal authority of violence). Some methods don't control some people, so its a smorgasbord and cocktail of control levers and mechanisms to keep everyone under perfect patriarchal control.

­

Some methods and messages of control are almost indistinguishable. I tried to weigh the violence outcome factors when the fine lines between methods and messages blurred too much.

The more violent methods (that are also messages) ended up in this chapter. The lesser violent ones ended up in the previous chapter.

­

Remember, any time a method works to terrorize and terrify one group of people, others are affected as well. Any time the quality of life is purposely degraded to depress and control villagers is a method of control. Depressed clay is more pliable in the hands of rulers. Anytime America does something violent to terrorize the world, it also terrorizes its own citizens. All these acts of violence work together for the perfect patriarchal police state.

­

All models of control, direct or indirect, in the United States has created a very peculiar, violent, male-Centered society that is exactly what the social planners want and continue. All you have to do is look past the rhetoric and the light show of propaganda to see how it works and who benefits.

­

Warrior Society. The state is organized around the principles of terror. Any time the world's richest nation spends 54.5 percent of its budget on "defense," and it has natural borders (peaceful Canada, impoverished Mexico, the Pacific and the Atlantic Ocean) its a warrior society. This means that it is male-centered, male-dominator culture and it is pyramidal in structure with elite, powerful males controlling all levels.

­

Savage Society. The result/consequence of a male-centered, warrior society and a raptor vicious "free market" that tramples people and their rights so the white male descendants of aristocratic families and other elite can secretly rule America by the use of designed force.

­

The Paradigm of Ancient, Desert Patriarchal Social Order/Biblical Political and Social Model of Control. The elite males of America embrace the Bible not for its messages of love, peace and brotherly love, but for the patriarchal social order that it extols. This because the ancient, desert patriarchal social order guarantees that a few males will own and control most of the village. To uphold this system, half the village (males) is given privileges/ownership/entitlement/dominion over the other half of the village (females).

­

Even the smallest amount of power for some males is addicting and corrupting. Besides, most males know at least secretly, that they are slaves to the male forces above them. They also know that the Patriarchs at the top are the most violent and powerful males of the village and they will think nothing of crushing a disobedient male who refuses to obey the biblically/desert structured system. So males take their powerlessness out on females to compensate. The instructions for this are clearly articulated in the hidden culture and language.

­

The two largest religions on the world (Christianity and Islam) are built upon the ancient, desert patriarchal social order. So is Judaism. Macho, misogynist with a great sense of entitlement (they're God's chosen/favorite people), the ancient, desert patriarchal social order mindset controls most of the societies and economics of the world.

­

The Business of America Is Business. That is the real Mission Statement of America. The morality of money rules and money has no morality. In fact, money relies on the immorality it causes (selfishness, greed, violence, poverty, violence of poverty, social chaos, so forth) to keep it wealthy and in power.

­

53% of Market Shares Are Owned by Top 1%. Propagandists and other representatives of the System constantly tell the village that "everyone" can "play" the stock market and that its "owned" by a "majority" of the villagers, that is not the real truth of the situation.

­

Over a third of market shares is owned by pension funds and the government and media says that "most" Americans have money in a pension plan. This is where they come up with the weak argument that the Market is owned by almost everybody.

­

The pitiful rest of market shares is owned individually by the top 10% with a few middle-class people owning shares.

­

This means that stock market is owned by the wealthy and a few speculators from the middle class. More, it is controlled by the wealthy and thus, the concerns and profits of the wealthy supersede any other concerns of others.

­

The Top 1% are mostly male and are what I call the "Teflon Investors." This is because these guys never get hurt financially like the other investors. It seems that they're always a step ahead and getting out of the market or certain corporate investments right before they crash. These guys are always making money on the stock market even when no one else is.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   59

Похожие:

Savage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture iconBotanical society of america annual reports, 2003 Officers A. President (Scott Russell) Botanical Society Of America

Savage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture iconOf the acoustical society of america

Savage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture iconOn Society, Culture, and Community

Savage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture iconStudies in Jewish Culture and Society

Savage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture iconDepartment of Technology, Culture & Society

Savage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture iconIsf 100D: Introduction to Technology, Society, and Culture

Savage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture iconIsf 100D: Introduction to Technology, Society, and Culture

Savage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture iconOptional course Course syllabus “Does Culture Matter in Civil Society?” Course description

Savage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture iconSeattle University Social Work Program Department of Society, Justice and Culture Winter, 2005

Savage society: decoding the enigma of america’s hidden culture iconNote: Hidden text with instructions can be viewed by clicking “Tools”, “Options”, “View” tab then checking “Hidden text” and “All” in the section “Non-printing characters. Please delete this notation after you have read the instructions

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница