Scaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals




Скачать 320.39 Kb.
НазваниеScaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals
страница4/5
Дата10.10.2012
Размер320.39 Kb.
ТипДокументы
1   2   3   4   5
PARTNERSHIPS


The process of strengthening nursing and midwifery should utilize every alliance and partnership that benefits or assists in progress towards achieving our aims or goals. Every person who contributes to the improvement of the health status of individuals is a potential partner. It is through partnerships that nurses and midwives can contribute to integrated health care provision working within a multi-disciplinary team. Inter professional and collaborative practice (Team working) is central to the concept of partnership both in health care system strengthening and within the professions of nursing and midwifery. More and more it is evident that nurses cannot work in isolation but must work as part of a multi disciplinary team that recognizes the expertise of each member and includes a wide range of cadres of health practitioners.


It is necessary to develop a wide range of partnerships at a number of different levels. These include partnerships with the community, with colleagues in health related professions, educational institutions, health service providers, NGO’s, international organizations and funding organizations. Partnerships can be established at local, regional or international levels. These partnerships can be formal with contractual agreements and memoranda of understanding or less formal arrangements agreed between the partners. Key challenges that face nurses and midwives when proposing partnerships include the identification of appropriate partners with common goals and complimentary levels of expertise, the acknowledgement of the value of their contribution in any partnership arrangement and the recognition that they are able to lead and maintain collegial and reciprocal relationships with partners. In order to encourage the development of partnerships that will lead to positive outcomes - the establishment of a data base listing potential partners is required and is seen as an important starting point.


The key objectives of this aspect of the Global Programme of Work are to:

  1. determine the scope and functions of nursing and midwifery partnerships

  2. establish a communication platform for partners involved in nursing and midwifery development for PHC

  3. enhance resources and support for nursing and midwifery programmes in PHC


Partnership is integral to the overall Global Program of Work . All the key areas in the GWP, education and training, workplace environment, health service provision and talent management require the development of key partners.


PLAN OF ACTION: PARTNERSHIPS

OBJECTIVE

ACTIVITY

TIME FRAME

INDICATOR

EXPECTED RESULTS

1. To determine the scope and functions of nursing and midwifery partnerships

Mapping and creating database of active/functional N&M partners


Collating and disseminating models of successful partnerships including mentoring, networking, twinning

Dec.2008

Data base on stakeholders and partners from 6 regions


Partnership models disseminated to all regions.



Integration of nursing and midwifery in national health systems and WHO priority programmes enhanced.


A Network of a wide range of partners, established.

2. To establish a communication platform for partners involved in nursing and midwifery development for PHC

Developing of an electronic platform to enhance networking and output of partners.

Dec 2008

Nursing and midwifery regional networks on PHC utilized by 6 regions




3. To enhance resources and support for nursing and midwifery programmes in PHC

Establishing a nursing and midwifery resource mobilization group at WHO


Developing partnerships plans for advocacy and resource mobilization for nursing and midwifery


Development of expertise in proposal development and procurement of funds



Dec 2009

Resource mobilization group established


Resource mobilization Plan piloted and disseminated in 2 regions


Joint Proposals for strengthening nursing and midwifery funded







9. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GLOBAL PROGRAMME OF WORK

The global programme of work for nursing and midwifery

The Global Work plan (GWP) will ensure that activities are focused on the agreed core elements for scaling up capacity of N&M to contribute to the achievement of the MDGs. It will actively involve:

  1. Member States,

  2. WHO/HQ and regional offices,

  3. The Global Advisory Group for Nursing and Midwifery Development (GAGNM)

  4. International agencies,

  5. Professional Associations

  6. Global network of WHOCC’s

  7. Stakeholders


This work will be carried out in a flexible, dynamic collaboration for HRH development recognizing the diverse country situations and priorities.. The GWP supports the renewal of PHC , seeks to enhance the commitment to health, and calls for active engagement of other sectors as participants and partners.


The development process of the Global Programme of Work


The Global and regional consultations were held in Geneva, Islamabad and Lusaka to identify and reach consensus on the core elements for scaling up nursing and midwifery capacity. Significant efforts were made to ensure that the global constituency and partners were represented in the planning, design and development of the GPW. Each core elements includes the objectives, activities, indicators, expected outcomes and timelines. The GPW is designed to provide the framework to assist national HRH planning and development of strategic actions required to strengthen nursing and midwifery and health systems. Data from the WHR 2005 and 2006 were utilized to guide the setting of realistic targets thereby increasing the probability of reaching the established goals within the specified timeframe.


Management of the Global Programme of Work


The Nursing and Midwifery Office at WHO, Geneva will serve as the Secretariat for the GPW for Nursing and Midwifery. It is complemented by the WHO Regional Offices, GAGNM, GNWHOCCs .The implementation program for each core element will be flexible, country – specific and conducted in collaboration with the Regional Offices of WHO, Member States and partners. Regional Nursing Advisers will be responsible for consulting with countries in order to identify those countries who will participate in the initial phase of the programme. .The selection will be undertaken following a set of criteria established by the secretariat. The criteria will include countries with a critical shortage of nursing and midwifery workforce, a capacity for HRH development, countries that have an HRH plan, a plan that impacts upon other countries in the region and a project plan that is measurable and achievable within the time specified. Selected countries will also be consulted on their preferred partners who will assist in the implementation of the project. The project will be operationalized through country action groups, led by a nurse or midwife appointed as the project leader with specific objectives and activities to be implemented in 2008 – 2009. The action group will put in place an operational plan for the achievement of the GWP.

The Secretariat will work in collaboration with the WHO regional offices and partners towards developing collaborative arrangements with member states and building and sustaining networks of partners, stakeholders and international agencies for strengthening nursing and midwifery. Monitoring and evaluation of the program will be conducted on a regular basis and progress will be disseminated through the NMO website as well as reported at the WHA in 2010 (as indicated in the WHA Resolution 59.27).


10. COORDINATION MECHANISMS

The coordination of work will comprise of:

  1. The Secretariat : WHO headquarters (Health Professional Networks: Nursing and Midwifery)


Responsibilities:

  1. Launch the GPW and host the inaugural meeting .

  2. Allocate initial resources to countries as specified in the GWP financial budget.

  3. Monitor activities as specified in the GWP and liaise with RNA’s and project leaders

  4. Convene formal meetings at least twice per year and prepare the necessary meeting agenda, materials and relevant documents

  5. Monitor country activities and progress towards goals

  6. Disseminate findings generated from activities under the GWP




  1. The Regional Advisers for Nursing and Midwifery

Responsibilities:

  1. Assist with the selection of participating countries and respective project leader




  1. Promote, facilitate and guide countries in the selection of a partner.

  2. Assist in the development of the project design

  3. Assist in the implementation of the country plan based on established targets

  1. Negotiate support from WHO country offices

  2. Provide logistical and technical support to country action groups and partners.



3. The Country Action Group

The country action group will be made up of representatives RNAs, project leader , the identified partner and stakeholders (interdisciplinary) . The responsibilities will be to:


  1. prepare a country -specific project plan for the implementation of the GPW in collaboration with the identified partner and stakeholders

  2. implement coordinate and monitor the project plan in a timely manner

  3. evaluate progress and outcomes of the plan.

  4. Submit progress report.

  5. mobilize additional resources

  6. meet with the WHO secretariat and regional advisers for a minimum of twice yearly.

  7. maintain communication with the WHO secretariat, RNA’s and other participating countries.


11. THE COMMUNICATION STRATEGY

The communication strategy will include, but will not be limited to, the following:


  1. Launch of the GWP at the Annual Meeting of May 2008 CNO meeting Geneva

  2. Production of advocacy materials – flyers , posters- targeting the stakeholders at the global, regional and country levels

  3. Inaugural meeting with project leaders from selected countries, partners and RNA’s

  4. Twice yearly monitoring meeting

  5. Regular contact through email and telephone communication

  6. Wide dissemination of the GWP and associated reports

  7. Production and dissemination of progress reports

  8. Use of websites and electronic communication platform (COPs) to report on progress



ANNEX 1: Tools , Partners, Resources and supporting mechanisms, other resources

Tools

  1. Competencies for N&M Educators; QA tools; Accreditation tools etc

  2. AMRO' document on PHC to be disseminated

  3. CN Leadership for Change Program materials, CNA Policy Workshop, Dorothy Wylie information, WPRO Nursing Policy Making Toolkit

  4. Available Information, communication Technology

  5. Strategic Directions on Nursing and Midwifery development


Partners

  1. WHO Collaborating Centres in collaboration with WHO (HQ, regional and country offices);

  2. Universities in resource high countries with necessary experience;

  3. Universities in target countries currently delivering training for nursing and midwifery educators as well as Bachelor’s programmes;

  4. Established universities in developed and developing countries with necessary experience;

  5. Funding bodies;

  6. Other agencies with similar or supportive activities

  7. Regional networks

  8. Ministries of Health in countries of implementation

  9. Nurses associations


Supportive mechanisms

Partnerships/twinning of training institutions

Joint planning, implementation and monitoring with WHO departments and partners

Community mobilization, involvement and participation

WHO regional advisers for nursing and midwifery

WHO Global Advisory on Nursing and Midwifery Development

ANNEX 2: WHA59:27 WHA59:23 Islamabad Declaration

ANNEX 3: REFERENCES

Armstrong S. (2003). Where there’s a will there’s a way: Nursing and midwifery champions in HIV/AIDS in Southern Africa. UNAIDS & SANNAM, Washington, DC.

Aiken L, Sloane D, Sochalski J (1998). Hospital organization and outcomes. Quality in Health Care, 7:222–226.

Bryce, J., Boschi-Pinto, C., Shibuya, K., Black, R. E., and WHO Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group. (2005) WHO estimates of the causes of death in children. Lancet, 365, 1147– 1152.

Butler, C. D. (2004) Human carrying capacity and human health. Public Library Science Medicine, 1, 192–194.

Buchan, J., and J. Sochalski. 2004. ‘‘The Migration of Nurses: Trends and Policies.’’

Buchan, J., Calman L. (2004). The global shortage of registered nurses: an overview of issues and actions. International council of nurses: Geneva, retrieved on March 16th 2007 http://.www.icn.ch/global/shortage.pdf

Butchan J., (1997). Health sector reform and human resource: Lessons from United Kingdom. Health policy and Planning, 12(4) 286-295

Dahlstrom et al, 2005: What motivates senior clinicians to teach medical students. BMC Medical Education, 2005, 5:27

Diaz-Bonilla E, Babinard J, Pinstrup-Andersen P (2001). Globalisation and health: a survey of opportunities and risks for the poor in developing countries. Geneva, Commission on Macroeconomics and Health.

Dovlo, D. 2006. ‘‘Ghanaian Health Workers on the Causes and Consequences of Migration.’’ In Globalizing Migration Regimes, New Challenges to Transnational Cooperation.

George A 2008. Nurses, community health workers, and home carers: gendered human resources compensating for skewed health systems. Global Public Health, 2008; 3(s1): 75-89


International Council of Nurses (1994). Position statement. Planning human resources for nursing. ICN web site. Available at: URL: http://www.ich.ch

International Council of Nurses (1999a). Position statement. International trade agreements. ICN web site. Available at: URL: http://www.icn.ch/pstradeagree.htm

International Council of Nurses (1999b). Position statement. Nurse retention, transfer and migration. ICN web site. Available at: URL: http://www.icn.ch/psretention.htm

Kent Rosenthal 2008. Ex-nurses just as vital as new grads. Nursing Review, Feb. 2008-02-25

O’Brien-Pallas L, et al. (1997). Strengthening nursing and midwifery: a global study. Geneva, World Health Organization.

Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). Development and strengthening of human resources management in the health sector. Washington DC, 128th Session of the Executive Committee. 2001

Sochalski J. (2002) Men Quitting Nursing At Nearly Twice The Rate Of Women. Published in “Is There A Male Nurse In The House?” Published on Sept. 6, 2002, The Associated Press Philadelphia. http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/09/06/health/main521057.shtml

Staiger DO, Auerbach DI, Buerhaus P (2000). Expanding career opportunities for women and the declining interest in nursing as a career. Nursing Economics, 18:230–236.

Stilwell B (2001). Health workers motivation in Zimbabwe. Report of Internal Study. World Health Organization, Geneva (unpublished document).

Stilwell B (2001). Health workers motivation in Zimbabwe. Report of Internal Study. World Health Organization, Geneva (unpublished document).

Pelletier Dianne et al.(2005). Undertsanding the nursing workforce: A longitudinal study of Australian nurses six years after graduate study. Australian Journal of Advanced nursing.


Weiss, R. A. and McMichael, A. J. (2004) Social and environmental risk factors in the emergence of infectious diseases. Nature Medicine, 10, S70–S76.

World Health Organization (1999). The world health report 1999 – Making a difference. Geneva, World Health Organization.

World Health Organization (2001). Macroeconomics and health: investing in health for economic development. Geneva, World Health Organization (Report of the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health).

World Health Organization. (2000). The World Health Report 2000 – Health Systems: Improving Performance. Geneva.

World Health Organization. (2004). Scaling Up HIV/AIDS Care: Service Delivery & Human Resources Perspectives. Geneva. Retrieved July 15, 2006, from http://www.who.int/hrh/documents/en/HRH_ART_paper.pdf.

The World Health Organization,(2005). Make every mother and child count. The World Health Report 2005. Geneva


World Health Organization. (2006) Making the most of existing health workers. The World Health Report 2006 – Working Together for Health (pp66-95). Geneva.

World Health Organization/ Pan American Health Orgaization, 2007. Renewing Primary health care: A position paper of the Pan American Health Organization /World Health Organization, PAHO/WHO/2007.


Wyss K. (2004) . Approaches to classifying human resource contrasting to attaining health related millennium development goals. Human Resource for Health, 2(11) 1-8

World Health Report 2003: Shaping the Future, Chapter 2, Millennium Health Goals: Paths to the future, Geneva, Switzerland.


The World Health Organization the African Regional Office 2006. WHO AFRO, Observatory, Congo Brazzaville.


WHO 1988. From Alma-Ata to the year 2000. Reflections at midpoint. World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

1   2   3   4   5

Похожие:

Scaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals iconTowards Universal Coverage and Transformation for Achieving the Millennium Development Goals

Scaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals iconCatherine McAuley School of Nursing & Midwifery

Scaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals iconSchool of Nursing and Midwifery The Course February 2006 0 foreword

Scaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals icon1. Title of Sub-programme: Enhancing Capacity in Basic Science Research and Training for Sustainable Development. 2

Scaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals iconIs Global Head of Oil & Gas for ifc, the private sector arm of the World Bank Group, which promotes development in emerging markets. In this capacity, Mr

Scaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals iconChapter 6: Vertical stratification and anisotropic scaling 1 Models of vertical stratification: local isotropy, trivial and scaling anisotropy

Scaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals iconCriterion : The Program shall have a clearly formulated and publicly stated mission with supporting goals and objectives. The Program shall foster the development of professional public health values

Scaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals iconDp united Nations Development Programme Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development arab human development report 2003

Scaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals iconIf you’re interested in submitting questions about your computer, would like to contribute to this newsletter, or have any suggestions, please send them to

Scaling-up Nursing and Midwifery Capacity to Contribute to the Millennium Development Goals iconReviews Scaling and the design of miniaturized chemical-analysis systems Free access

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница