Acknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1




НазваниеAcknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1
страница4/14
Дата09.10.2012
Размер0.93 Mb.
ТипДокументы
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14

1.2 Translocations


Translocation is the movement of living organisms from one area with free release in another (IUCN 1987) and can be undertaken in three different ways:

Introduction is the deliberate or accidental translocation of a species into the wild in areas where it does not occur naturally.

Re-introduction is the deliberate or accidental translocation of a species into the wild in areas where it was indigenous in historic times but is no longer present.

Re-stocking is the translocation of an organism into the wild into an area where it is already present.

Translocations are becoming a popular management tool for conserving and restoring biodiversity and maintaining ecosystem function. Translocation programs aim to enhance the persistence and resilience of species by establishing or maintaining viable populations and mainly target threatened or keystone species. There are numerous examples of translocations of various taxa throughout the world (reviewed in: Griffith et al. 1989; Fischer and Lindenmayer 2000; Seddon et al. 2007), including plants (Stewart 2003), mammals (Pinter-Wollman et al. 2009; Poole and Lawton 2009), birds (Reese and Connelly 1997; Parker and Laurence 2008), amphibians (Hambler 1994; Griffiths and Pavajeau 2008), reptiles (Nelson et al. 2002; Germano and Bishop 2008), fish (Minckley 1995; Shute et al. 2005; Rakes and Shute 2006) and invertebrates (Wynhoff 1998). Many species translocations have occurred within Australia, for example, Short (2009) compiled 380 translocations of 102 threatened native vertebrate species focusing on mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians.

Managers designing translocation events must make several critical and occasionally difficult decisions, particularly when population growth and future funding is uncertain (Haight et al. 2000). These include: where to source individuals for translocation; the number, age and sex ratio of individuals to translocate; the location, number and timing of releases; methods of collection, transportation and release; post-monitoring procedure and frequency; and the allocation of limited budget, staffing and resources among these activities. Translocations are an inherent part of captive breeding programs for species recovery (e.g. Tweed et al. 2003; Shute et al. 2005). Captive breeding techniques allow the production of large numbers of individuals to begin new populations with minimal detrimental effects on small source populations. However, there are often difficulties with establishing wild populations from captive-bred stock (Griffith et al. 1989; Snyder et al. 1996).

Increasing the number of Barred Galaxias populations and individuals is a recovery objective of the National Recovery Plan for Barred Galaxias (Raadik et al. 2010). Its associated recovery actions include investigating captive breeding techniques for Barred Galaxias, as well as planning and conducting translocations and maintaining these new populations. Translocations of Barred Galaxias are anticipated to reduce reliance on expensive captive management and improve the resilience and conservation of Barred Galaxias under changing environmental conditions.

1.3 Project objectives


This study aimed to improve the recovery of post-fire affected Barred Galaxias populations and reduce their overall extinction risk by establishing new populations in suitable streams within their former range.

Specifically, we:

• Developed guidelines for the translocation of Barred Galaxias for conservation purposes (separate document, see Ayres et al. 2012).

• Identified potential translocation sites for Barred Galaxias and assessed their suitability.

• Conducted two trial translocations of Barred Galaxias and assessed their short-term success.

• Analysed the population genetics of Barred Galaxias across their existing range.

This project delivers several high priority actions consistent with the species’ National Recovery Plan (Raadik et al. 2010), the Victorian Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act Action Statement (Koehn and Raadik 1996; Raadik in review) and the Actions for Biodiversity Conservation (ABC) management system.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14

Похожие:

Acknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1 iconAcknowledgements IV Summary V 1 Introduction 1 2 Methods 2

Acknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1 iconAcknowledgements I Abbreviations II Executive summary IV Foundations for the Research Introduction 1

Acknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1 iconSummary and acknowledgements

Acknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1 iconGeneral summary

Acknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1 iconPart 1 general 01 summary

Acknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1 iconGeneral executive Summary

Acknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1 iconExecutive Summary Introduction

Acknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1 iconSummary Chapter 1, Introduction (Mattias Fritz)

Acknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1 iconGeneral introduction

Acknowledgements V Summary VI 1 General introduction 1 1 Barred Galaxias 1 iconIntroduction to nato rto & CoBP/codex tbd executive Summary

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница