Studie úČinnosti světelné terapie 1981 2008 pramen: PubMed – service of the U. S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health




НазваниеStudie úČinnosti světelné terapie 1981 2008 pramen: PubMed – service of the U. S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health
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Review

PMID: 17927295


29: Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2007;9(3):291-300.


The phase shift hypothesis for the circadian component of winter depression.

Lewy AJ, Rough JN, Songer JB, Mishra N, Yuhas K, Emens JS.

Oregon Health & Science University, Department of Psychiatry, Sleep and Mood

Disorders Laboratory, Portland, Oregon, USA. lewy@ohsu.edu

The finding that bright light can suppress melatonin production led to the study of two situations, indeed, models, of light deprivation: totally blind people and winter depressives. The leading hypothesis for winter depression (seasonal affective disorder, or SAD) is the phase shift hypothesis (PSH). The PSH was recently established in a study in which SAD patients were given low-dose melatonin in the afternoon/evening to cause phase advances, or in the morning to cause phase delays, or placebo. The prototypical phase-delayed patient, as well as the smaller subgroup of phase-advanced patients, optimally responded to melatonin given at the correct time. Symptom severity improved as circadian misalignment was corrected. Circadian misalignment is best measured as the time interval between the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) and mid-sleep. Using the operational definition of the plasma DLMO as the interpolated time when melatonin levels continuously rise above the threshold of 10 pg/mL, the average interval between DLMO and mid-sleep in healthy controls is 6 hours, which is associated with optimal mood in SAD patients.


Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Review

PMID: 17969866


30: Rev Med Liege. 2007;62 Spec No:25-32.


[Bright light therapy]

[Article in French]

Poirrier R, Cambron L.

Service de Neurologie, Centre d'Etude des Troubles de l'Eveil et du Sommeil, CHU Sart Tilman, Liège, Belgique.

Bright light therapy is a treatment that emerged in the eighties of the last century. It can be used in different pathologies such as seasonal affective disorders, major depressions, and many disorders of the wake-sleep rhythm, whether they are of primary or secondary origin. Important progress made at the basic neuroscience levels, allows today a sound understanding of the bright light mode of action. Moreover, the main indications are now the subject of consensus reports and meta-analyses which show good levels of evidence-based medicine. Bright light therapy constitutes a first choice indication in seasonal affective disorder. It is also perfectly possible to prescribe bright light therapy in the major depression disorders. It has been demonstrated that the effect size is the same as with antidepressants of reference. It is admitted nowadays that bright light therapy may be at least, an adjunct to pharmacotherapy, in order to accelerate the antidepressant effect onset, or to prolong this effect after withdrawal of the drug. Bright light therapy can also be viewed as an alternative to the pharmacological approach especially when this one is impossible, not tolerated or not accepted by the patient. The contraindications are rare.


English Abstract

PMID: 18214357 [PubMed - in process]


31: Bioorg Med Chem. 2006 Dec 15;14(24):8635-43. Epub 2006 Aug 30.


A cationic chalcogenoxanthylium photosensitizer effective in vitro in chemosensitive and multidrug-resistant cells.

Holt JJ, Gannon MK 2nd, Tombline G, McCarty TA, Page PM, Bright FV, Detty MR.

Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260-3000, USA.

Pentacyclic thio- (1) and seleno- (2) analogues of tetramethylrosamine (TMR) were prepared with a julolidyl fragment replacing the 3-dimethylamino substituent in the xanthylium core. The pentacylic structure increases the lipophilicity of 1 and 2 relative to TMR-S and TMR-Se and locks the lone-pair of electrons on the julolidyl N atom into conjugation with the xanthylium core. This conformational rigidization leads to longer wavelengths of absorption, but has little impact on other photophysical properties such as quantum yields for fluorescence and singlet-oxygen generation and fluorescence lifetimes in 1 and 2 relative to TMR-S and TMR-Se. Both 1 and 2 are effective photosensitizers against chemosensitive AUXB1 cells in vitro at 1x10(-7)M and compound 2 is an effective photosensitizer against multidrug-resistant CR1R12 cells in vitro at 1x10(-7)M. While the uptake TMR-S into CR1R12 cells as measured by fluorescence is significantly lower than uptake into chemosensitive AUXB1 cells, there is no significant difference in the uptake of 1 into either AUXB1 or CR1R12 cells. The addition of 2x10(-4)M verapamil to the cells prior to treatment with 1 had no significant effect on the uptake of 1 into either AUXB1 or CR1R12 cells. Treating lipid-activated, purified Pgp with 2 and light gave complete inhibition of Pgp ATPase activity.


Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

PMID: 16945541

32: Am J Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;163(12):2126-33.


Erratum in:

Am J Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;164(3):529.

Controlled trial of naturalistic dawn simulation and negative air ionization for seasonal affective disorder.

Terman M, Terman JS.

Department of Biopsychology, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY

10032, USA. mt12@columbia.edu

OBJECTIVE: This trial assessed two novel nonpharmaceutical treatments for winter depression-naturalistic dawn simulation and high-density negative air ionization-delivered during the final hours of sleep. METHOD: The patients were 99 adults (77 women and 22 men) with the winter seasonal pattern of major depressive disorder (94 cases) and bipolar II disorder (five cases). Five parallel groups received 1) dawn simulation (0.0003-250 lux in the pattern of May 5 at 45 degrees north latitude); 2) a dawn light pulse (13 minutes, 250 lux, with an illuminant dose of 3.25x10(3) lux-minutes matched to the simulated dawn); 3) postawakening bright light (30 minutes, 10,000 lux); 4) negative air ionization at high flow rate (93 minutes, 4.5x10(14 )ions/second); or 5) ionization at low flow rate (93 minutes, 1.7x10(11) ions/second). The symptoms were assessed over 3 weeks with the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-Seasonal Affective Disorder Version. RESULTS: Posttreatment improvement results were bright light, 57.1%; dawn simulation, 49.5%; dawn pulse, 42.7%; high-density ions, 47.9%; and low-density ions, 22.7% (significantly lower than the others). Contrary to the authors' hypothesis, analysis of variance failed to find superiority of dawn simulation to the dawn pulse or bright light. However, the dawn pulse led to a pattern of residual or exacerbated depressive symptoms similar to those seen in low-density ion nonresponders. CONCLUSIONS:

Naturalistic dawn simulation and high-density ionization are active antidepressants that do not require the effort of postawakening bright light therapy. They can be considered candidate alternatives to bright light or medication.


Comparative Study

Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

PMID: 17151164


33: Arch Intern Med. 2006 Nov 13;166(20):2182-8.


Effectiveness of nonpharmacological interventions for the management of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with dementia: a systematic review.

Ayalon L, Gum AM, Feliciano L, Areán PA.

School of Social Work, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel. layalon@iit.edu

BACKGROUND: Recent reports documenting limited evidence supporting the use of pharmacological interventions for neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) and increased risk of death, the black box warnings against the use of atypical antipsychotic drugs in older adults, and Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act regulations suggest the need to evaluate the usefulness of nonpharmacological interventions in the management of NPS of dementia. METHODS: To determine the evidence base of nonpharmacological interventions for the management of NPS in patients with dementia, we reviewed MEDLINE, PsycINFO, the Cochrane library, and relevant bibliographies published from January 1966 to December 2005, using the American Psychological Association Guidelines. RESULTS: Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 6 single-case designs (SCDs; N of 1 trials) met inclusion criteria. Under unmet needs interventions, 1 SCD found a moderate reduction in problem behaviors. Under behavioral interventions, based on observational data, all 4 SCDs reported a relative reduction of 50% to 100% in neuropsychiatric symptoms. Under caregiving interventions, there were 3 RCTs. At the 6-month follow-up, 1 RCT found a reduction in 4 neuropsychiatric symptom subscales: ideation disturbance score (0.3 vs 0.5; range, 0-8; P = .005); irritability score (18.8 vs 23.0; range, 8-38; P = .008); verbal agitation, as measured by mean frequency of 20-minute outbursts (0.5 vs 0.8; P = .005); and physical aggression score (11.4 vs 12.9; range, 6-42; P<.001). Another RCT found a significant improvement in frequency (2.3 vs 3.1; range, 0-4; P<.001) and severity (2.2 vs 2.8; range, 0-4; P<.001) of target behaviors associated with the intervention arm. The third RCT found no effect. Under bright light therapy, 1 SCD found short-term improvements on the Agitated Behavior Rating Scale (9.7 vs 19.9; P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative research to date on the impact of nonpharmacologic interventions for NPS among patients with dementia indicates that interventions that address behavioral issues and unmet needs and that include caregivers or bright light therapy may be efficacious. More high-quality research is necessary to confirm these findings.


Review

PMID: 17101935


34: J Psychopharmacol. 2006 Nov;20(6):732-55.


Clinical practice with anti-dementia drugs: a consensus statement from British Association for Psychopharmacology.

Burns A, O'Brien J; BAP Dementia Consensus group, Auriacombe S, Ballard C, Broich K, Bullock R, Feldman H, Ford G, Knapp M, McCaddon A, Iliffe S, Jacova C, Jones R, Lennon S, McKeith I, Orgogozo JM, Purandare N, Richardson M, Ritchie C, Thomas A, Warner J, Wilcock G, Wilkinson D; British Association for Psychopharmacology.

University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. alistair.burns@manchester.ac.uk

The British Association for Psychopharmacology (BAP) coordinated a meeting of experts to review the evidence on the drug treatment for dementia. The level of evidence (types) was rated using a standard system: Types 1a and 1b (evidence from meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials or at least one controlled trial respectively); types 2a and 2b (one well-designed study or one other type of quasi experimental study respectively); type 3 (non-experimental descriptive studies); and type 4 (expert opinion). There is type 1a evidence for cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease; memantine for moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease; and for the use of bright light therapy and aromatherapy. There is type 1a evidence of no effect of anti inflammatory drugs or statins. There is conflicting evidence regarding oestrogens, with type 2a evidence of a protective effect of oestrogens but 1b evidence of a harmful effect. Type 1a evidence for any effect of B12 and folate will be forthcoming when current trials report. There is type 1b evidence for gingko biloba in producing a modest benefit of cognitive function; cholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of people with Lewy body disease (particularly neuropsychiatric symptoms); cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine in treatment cognitive impairment associated with vascular dementia; and the effect of metal collating agents (although these should not be prescribed until more data on safety and efficacy are available). There is type 1b evidence to show that neither cholinesterase inhibitors nor vitamin E reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in people with mild cognitive impairment; and there is no evidence that there is any intervention that can prevent the onset of dementia. There is type 1b evidence for the beneficial effects of adding memantine to cholinesterase inhibitors, and type 2b evidence of positive switching outcomes from one cholinesterase inhibitor to another. There is type 2a evidence for a positive effect of reminiscence therapy, and type 2a evidence that cognitive training does not work. There is type 3 evidence to support the use of psychological interventions in dementia. There is type 2 evidence that a clinical diagnosis of dementia can be made accurately and that brain imaging increases that accuracy.Although the consensus statement dealt largely with medication, the role of dementia care in secondary services (geriatric medicine and old age psychiatry) and primary care, along with health economics, was discussed. There is ample evidence that there are effective treatments for people with dementia, and Alzheimer's disease in particular. Patients, their carers, and clinicians deserve to be optimistic in a field which often attracts therapeutic nihilism.


Guideline

Review

PMID: 17060346


35: J Clin Psychiatry. 2006 Oct;67(10):1527-35.


An open trial of light therapy in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Rybak YE, McNeely HE, Mackenzie BE, Jain UR, Levitan RD.

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Department of Psychiatry, University

of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. irybak@uwo.ca

OBJECTIVE: In adults with attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a delayed sleep/ activity rhythm and/or seasonal mood symptoms may contribute significantly to core pathology and disability. This study examined whether a chronobiologically based treatment, i.e., morning bright light therapy (LT), might have utility as an adjunctive treatment for adult ADHD in the fall/ winter period. METHOD: Twenty-nine adults with DSM-IV ADHD were administered a standard 3-week open trial of LT during the fall or winter months. Primary outcome measures included percentage reduction on the Brown Adult ADD Scale and the Conners' Adult ADHD Scale. Secondary measures were decrease in depression scores according to the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Seasonal Affective Disorder version; improvements on various neuropsychological tests; and shift toward an earlier circadian preference as measured by the Horne-Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness questionnaire. Regression analyses determined which variables at baseline best predicted improvement on a given outcome measure and which variables changed in parallel with one another.

The study was conducted from November 2003 through February 2004. RESULTS:

Morning bright light therapy was associated with a significant decrease in both subjective and objective measures of core ADHD pathology, improved mood symptoms, and a significant phase advance in circadian preference. Multiple regression showed that the shift toward an earlier circadian preference with LT was the strongest predictor of improvement on both subjective and objective ADHD measures. Neither baseline global seasonality scores nor baseline depression scores strongly predicted LT effects on most measures of ADHD. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that during the fall/winter period, LT may be a useful adjunct in many adults with ADHD. Strikingly, the strongest correlate of improvement in core ADHD pathology was a phase advance in circadian preference rather than alleviation of comorbid seasonal affective disorder, suggesting important clinical benefits of LT beyond the treatment of seasonal affective disorder.

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