Topic: New York Tackles Climate Change: Promoting Renewable Energy and Capping Greenhouse Gas Emissions




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NOVEMBER 2005 NEWSLETTER

November Meeting Announcement

This event is jointly sponsored with the Sallan Foundation and the

Environmental Science section of the New York Academy of Sciences.

Topic:       New York Tackles Climate Change: Promoting Renewable Energy and Capping Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Speakers:   Katherine Kennedy, Natural Resources Defense Council

Franz Litz, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation

Moderator: Stephen Hammer, Columbia University

Where:       New York Academy of Sciences, 2 East 63rd Street

Registration required. Follow “events” link at . 

NYAS members free, $20 others

When:         Tuesday, November 15, 6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT has not adopted mandatory measures to reduce or stabilize CO2 emissions. This is of concern since the United States has 5% of the world's population but it produces over 23% of all CO2 emissions. Now, states and localities are taking the lead in climate change innovations and New York is a leader.  New York State’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requires that by 2013 no less than 25% of the electricity sold in the state by investor-owned utilities come from renewable resources, up from the current figure of 18-19%. Reaching the 25% goal will require an estimated 3,700 megawatts of new renewable power and it has the potential to have a significant impact on air quality and the State's consumption of carbon-based fuels. 

            The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, launched in April 2003, when Governor George Pataki invited governors of neighboring states to work together to develop a mandatory, regional carbon cap-and-trade program, relies on a combination of government mandate and market forces to achieve reductions in carbon emissions from electric power utilities. The panel will also examine why it is so difficult for cities to address climate change and how state initiatives may affect cities

.

            Katherine Kennedy, senior attorney in the Natural Resources Defense Council's Air and Energy program, represented NRDC in the administrative proceedings that led to the adoption of New York's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

            Franz Litz, Greenhouse Gas Strategy Coordinator for the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), serves as principal representative and chairs the state staff representatives' RGGI discussions.

            Stephen Hammer, Adjunct Assistant Professor at Columbia University, teaches a course on urban energy policy. His Ph.D. dissertation from the London School of Economics focuses on renewable urban energy policy making.

 

2005-6 AEE-NY Advance Planning Calendar  (Third Tuesdays)





December

No meeting. Happy Holidays!

January 17

BioFuel:  NYC Pilot Report

February 21

History of Energy Innovation in NYC

March 21

NYC Energy Policy Update

April 18

Greening University Campuses

May 16

HVAC & BAS Optimization

June 20

June Gala & Awards Dinner

AEE-NY is pleased to present this program in cooperation with the

Environmental Business Association of New York and the EBA Energy Task Force

                                                Current NY Chapter AEE Sponsors:

Association for Energy Affordability     Con Ed Solutions        EME Group

Con Edison        PB Power           Syska Hennessy Group         Trystate Mechanical Inc.

Field Trip to Time-Life Chiller Plant

By John Leffler

ABOUT 20 people visited the Time Life Building (1271 Avenue of the Americas) chiller plant on Tuesday, October 18.  An initial briefing about the plant and its design took place in a basement room near the plant.  A booklet containing material about the plant was distributed to the attendees.  William Stoddard, VP for Projects and Engineering, The Rockefeller Group Development Corporation, gave an overview followed by comments by Joseph Rubino of AKF Engineers and Ron Perez, chief operating engineer of the building.  A brief question and answer session followed the comments and then the group proceeded to the chiller room. 

            Fortunately, only one chiller, the steam turbine drive, was operating so the noise level was low enough to allow discussion.  After hearing a description of and seeing the various pieces of equipment located there, most of the discussion took place in groups centered around Mr. Stoddard, Mr. Rubino, Mr. Perez and Richard Tully, from Interstate Mechanical, who joined the tour while in the plant. 

            A walk through of the rigging path between the plant and the basement loading dock was given, pointing out where part of the wall adjacent to a doorway was removed to allow larger equipment to be moved in.  Finally, the group went to the top of the building to view the condenser water pumps, the cooling towers, the former upper level chiller plant and onto the roof to view the engine exhaust pipe running through the building roof. 

            After its 2001 renovation, the plant can use Con Ed steam, electricity or natural gas to produce cooling.  The original chiller plants, one lower and one upper, all used steam turbine centrifugal chillers.  The current plant, which is located in the basement and serves the entire building, uses all centrifugal chillers but with various drives. 

            There are four chillers.  One is a 1500 ton steam turbine drive and one is a 2100 ton electric drive. The other two each have a single evaporator and condenser shell connected by refrigerant piping to both an electric motor driven compressor and a gas engine driven compressor.  Either the motor or the engine operates to drive its respective compressor to produce 1850 tons of cooling from each chiller. Overall, there are four chillers with six compressors and six drive units.

            In general, gas is used weekday days and electricity at night and weekends.  There is also a plate and frame heat exchanger that cools chilled water using tower water when the outside air temperature and humidity are low enough.

            Chilled water pumping is primary; that is, one set of pumps moves the water through the chillers out to the loads and back to the chillers.  The lower zone chilled water pumps are located in the plant near the chillers and the upper zone pumps are in the former plant at the top of the building.  The upper chilled water distribution loop is connected to the plant through a heat exchanger located in the 10th floor mechanical room that provides a pressure break.  The heat exchanger acts as a load on the plant and as a source of cooling for the upper part of the building.

            The upper plant at the top of the building is abandoned in place until a new use is found for the space.  The cooling towers are on the top of the building and the condenser water pumps are just below them in a mechanical room.  The engine drive exhaust gas piping runs up through a former fire tower opening and discharges above the top floor roof that is level with the tops of the cooling towers. The former fire tower opening was converted to shaft space when stairwell pressurization systems were installed.  

            All the demolition of the old plant and construction of the new one occurred while keeping chilled water available to the building.

            There are more details in an article that appeared in the January 2001 issue of Consulting Specifying Engineer. York International, which provided the chillers, has an HVAC/R Engineering Profile about the project, and there is an article in the Resources section of the AKF website (akf-engineers.com).

            We thank Mr. Stoddard for arranging this tour, providing the written materials and getting people involved in the design, construction and operation of the plant to be a part of the tour presentation.   We also thank Mr. Rubino, Mr. Perez and Mr. Tully for taking the time to attend and speak about the project.  It was an enjoyable, interesting and educational experience.

Please note: There’s lots more after the ads. But don’t skip the ads. These enterprises are our consistant supporters! Dick Koral

ADVERTISEMENTS

HEATING    –    VENTILATING    –    AIR CONDITIONING    -    MAINTENANCE

TRYSTATE

Mechanical Inc.

Joseph Colella, V.P. Operations

471 McLean Avenue, Yonkers, NY 10705                                                                                                            

Tel: 914-963-6120                                                                                                   Fax: 914-963-0428                

                   BELZONA High performance metal, rubber, concrete, waterproofing, & energy efficiency enhancement polymers for repair and protection of machinery (pumps), buildings, & structures. 

Jack L. Prince, PE, CEM, President

Belzona New York, LLC

1 Robert Lane, Glen Head, NY 11545

Tel: 516-656-0220Fax: 516-656-0474www.belzona.com

Syska Hennessy Group, Inc.

Contact: Lawrence Gottesman, Group Manager, Energy Services
11 W. 42nd Street
New York, NY 10036
Tel: 212.556.3461 
Fax: 212.556.3223           LGottesman@Syska.com                          http://www.Syska.com

Consulting + Engineering + Technology + Construction



ConEdison Solutions offers competitively priced electricity supply, Green Power, and a wide range of energy services from consulting to construction and operation.

701 Westchester Avenue  —  Suite 300 East  —  White Plains, NY 10604  —  1-888-210-8899
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