Department of english university college dublin




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DEPARTMENT

OF

ENGLISH




UNIVERSITY COLLEGE DUBLIN




THIRD YEAR

COURSE BOOKLET

MOde II


2002-03


PLEASE TAKE CARE OF THIS BOOKLET

AS



YOU WILL NEED IT THROUGHOUT THE


ACADEMIC YEAR


All this information and more can be found on the department’s website:


www.ucd.ie/~english


Contents:

General Advice and Staff Information p. 1

Summary of Important Information p. 2

Introduction to Third Year English p. 3

Regulations (Continuous Assessment and Examinations) p. 6

Lecture Schedule and Course Descriptions p. 8

Seminar Options and Course Descriptions (First Semester) p. 14

Seminar Options and Course Descriptions (Second Semester) p. 24

Essay Style Sheet p. 30


GENERAL ADVICE: The following is a list of those who will advise and help you should you experience problems during the year—talk to someone; don’t keep it to yourself!

  • Your student representative

  • Your tutors

  • Your seminar leaders

  • Your lecturers

  • Heads of Third Year English (Dr Callan J209 Tel. 7168158) (Dr Robson F105 Tel. 7168184) (Dr Brannigan K202 Tel. 7168181) (Dr Clutterbuck J216 Tel. 7168238)

  • Chair of the Combined Departments of English (Prof. Clayton J205 Tel. 7168251)

  • Associate Dean of Undergraduate Advising (Mr Latham A107 Tel: 7168391 K205 Tel: 7168476)

  • Student Advisers (Mr Garde Tel: 7168366 Ms O’Grady Tel: 7161727 www.ucd.ie/~advisers)

  • Disability Officer (Mr Bennett Tel: 7167565

  • dss@ucd.ie; www.ucd.ie/disability)

  • Student Union Services (Welfare) (Student Centre Tel. 7163112)

  • Student Health Services: (Student Centre Tel: 7163133 & 7163134)




English Department Staff

Office

Extension

Dr. Wanda Balzano

C208

8530

Dr John Barrett

J218

8256

Dr John Brannigan

K202

8181

Mr James Byrne

J213

8488

Dr Ron Callan

J209

8158

Professor Andrew Carpenter

J303

8792

Dr Janet Clare

C210A

8695

Professor Mary Clayton (Head of Department)

J205

8251

Dr Catriona Clutterbuck

J213

8238

Dr Jerome de Groot

C210C

8694

Professor T. P. Dolan

J215

8156

Mr Brian Donnelly

J214

8160

Dr Alan Fletcher

J217

8418

Dr Anne Fogarty

J211

8159

Dr Eldrid Herrington

C209

8622

Professor Declan Kiberd

J203

8348

Dr Jarlath Killeen

J213

8238

Ms Aoife Leahy

C208

8530

Professor Peter Lucas

J204

8155

Dr Frank McGuinness

J212

8420

Professor J.C.C. Mays

J202

8346

Dr Margaret Robson

F105

8184

Dr Anthony Roche

J210

8192

Dr Philippa Sheppard

K203

8260

Dr Maria Stuart

C210

8681

Office Hours for members of the department are listed on the Department of English notice-board and website.

THIRD YEAR ENGLISH


Summary of Important Information


LECTURE COURSES BEGIN: Week beginning 16th September

First lecture: Tuesday September 17th, 12.00noon, Theatre M (Old and Middle English course)


INTRODUCTORY LECTURE: Wednesday 18th September, 11am, Theatre M


REGISTRATION FOR SEMINARS:

  • Thursday, 26th September, Room J208

10.30 am-12.00noon and 3.00-4.30 pm (PASSPORT PHOTO ESSENTIAL)


REGISTRATION FOR TUTORIAL SEMINARS:

  • Thursday, 26th September, Room J207

10.30 am-12.00noon and 3.00-4.30 pm (PASSPORT PHOTO ESSENTIAL)


SEMINARS BEGIN:

First Semester: Week beginning 30th September

Second Semester: Week beginning 6th January

TUTORIAL SEMINARS BEGIN:

First Semester: Week beginning 30th September

Second Semester: Week beginning 20th January


DATES OF ACADEMIC YEAR 2001-2002:

16th September to 6th December

6th January to 28th February

24th March to 25th April

Bank Holidays:

28th October 2002

17th March 2003

18th April 2003

21st April 2003


READING WEEK: 28th October to 1st November (NO UNDERGRADUATE CLASSES)


ESSAY DEADLINES:

First Semester Seminar Essay:

By 4.30 pm Monday 16th December


Second Semester Seminar Essay:

By 4.30 pm Monday 10th March


INTRODUCTION TO THIRD YEAR ENGLISH, 2002-2003

Mode II students


Third Year English builds on your training in First and Second Year English towards critical analytical and writing skills, towards breadth and depth of literary, historical and theoretical knowledge, and towards well-founded originality of understanding of the relations between form and content, text and context.


Assessment analysis: One quarter of your final results in Third Year English will be drawn from the work you do in seminars; over half will be based on your work for the six individual lecture courses you will take; and almost one fifth will be based on a demonstration of close reading and an ability to compare the material of various lecture courses. Preparing for the end-of-year examinations will be one significant element of your weekly English tutorial seminar. Hence the three types of teaching and learning—seminars, lectures and tutorial seminars—are essential to your overall success this year.


Beneficial Aggregation: Third Year students carry forward 30% of their Second Year marks. An individual’s marks will become part of their B.A. degree results only if they are beneficial to the student. Students will receive:

either

  • the combined 30% (Second Year) and 70% (Third Year) marks

or

  • 100% Third Year marks

depending on whichever is the higher


Attendance: In Third Year, Mode 2, you are required to attend three lecture courses in each semester, one seminar course in each semester, and one tutorial seminar throughout the academic year.

Bear in mind that your attendance will be monitored, and that penalties may accrue to your continuous assessment marks for non-attendance (see section on Seminar Regulations elsewhere in this Booklet).


Books: It is expected that students will buy and read all “Required Reading” for their courses. Orders for all books have been placed with the Campus Bookstore.


Website: The website for the Department of English is available at the following address: www.ucd.ie/~english

It contains

  • Third Year English booklet

  • valuable links to a number of sites

  • notices and information throughout the year

  • individual pages for each member of staff

  • page for tutors

Lecture Courses (ENG 3011/3012/3013/3014/3015/3016):


How many?

You will take two Modern English and one Old and Middle English lecture courses in each semester.


How are these lecture courses different to First and Second Year courses?

Your First and Second year lecture courses focused on specific literary genres, periods, and national literatures. The focus is now extended through a particular concentration on how the social and political contexts of literature can be seen in the way in which literary categories and criteria of excellence are formed, challenged and shown to be contingent and hybrid. The lecture courses will achieve this through, for example:

(a) exploring how Medieval stories of fantasy and adventure express their social and ethical contexts

(“Epic and Romance” ENG 3011)

(b) considering the changing ideas of canon and epic over time

(“The Formation of Canons” ENG 3016)

(c) examining how gender issues alter our understanding of “high art”

(“Gender and Writing” ENG 3015)

(d) exploring the function of dream-visions in the Middle Ages to articulate new ideas and offer a critique of society

(“Mediaeval Dream-Visions” ENG 3012)

(e) comparing different national literatures

(“Literature of Nations” ENG 3014)

(f) measuring how modern drama traces the investment of power in the Establishment

(“Tradition and Experimentation” ENG 3013)


Seminars Options (ENG 3018/3019):


How many seminars must I take?

Mode II students must attend and complete the work for two seminars over the year.


How do I register for seminars?

Elsewhere in this handbook you will find a complete list of seminar options, and you should make your choices during the first week of term. Seminar registration for UCD students only is on Thursday, 26th September in J208, from 10.30am to 12.00 noon and from 3.00pm to 4.30 pm. (JYA and Erasmus students will be registered for tutorial seminars at a separate session, to be announced.) Seminar places are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Classes will start in the week beginning 30th September.

NOTE: You will not be allowed to register for seminars without a single passport-sized photo.


What kind of work is expected of me in the seminar?

A seminar is very much a work in progress. In relation to one specific topic over nine weeks, together you create the debate that gives the seminar life and through which your own critical analytical skills develop. These skills are tested and will grow through the challenge you set yourself to become involved in group work. With this approach to class work—discovering, comparing, contrasting and developing your position on issues that arise in the course through open-ended exploratory engagement with texts and contexts in debate with your fellow students and course-leader—the success of the seminar is guaranteed.


What does this mean in practical terms?

When you sign on for a seminar you enter a contract: you agree to do the set primary reading (and viewing, if required) each week and to come to class with questions and insights sparked off by this reading and some ongoing secondary reading. Often, one or more students will be asked to prepare a class presentation on a specific topic or text, but every student in the group should prepare their own response to this material. Informal meetings between two or more students outside class times to discuss texts will yield good results. You will be asked to develop an essay title well before the end of the course, and you should begin to think about possible essay topics from the first week of the course.


Hints for essay writing:

The kind of seminar essay required is a well-planned, well-organised exploration of a selected topic, as agreed with your seminar leader. The bases of the essay should be analysis and argument with examples carefully chosen to back up your argument. You should identify and then engage with the challenges raised by the essay topic in as broad-ranging and in-depth a manner as possible, testing counter-arguments where appropriate. Where you use experts you should enter into dialogue with them and seek to assimilate their views in an argumentative spirit. Writing more than one draft will almost always improve your standard. Please set aside time for the preparation and writing of your essay!


Tutorial seminars (ENG 3017):


How often must I attend?

You are required to attend one tutorial seminar per week for nine weeks of each semester. Six weeks of tutorial seminars in each semester will be devoted to Modern English and three weeks to Old and Middle English. You will not change rooms for this tutorial seminar; however, in some tutorial groups you will change tutors.


How do I register for tutorial seminars?

Tutorial seminar registration for UCD students only is on Thursday, 26th September in J207, from 10.30am to 12.00 noon and from 3.00pm to 4.30 pm. (JYA and Erasmus students will be registered for tutorial seminars at a separate session, to be announced.) Tutors and tutorial seminar times will be posted beforehand. Tutorial seminar places are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

NOTE: You will not be allowed to register for tutorial seminars without a single passport-sized photo.


What is the purpose of the tutorial seminar?

Third Year tutorial seminars have a four-fold purpose:

(a) to allow you a space free of the pressures of assessments which count towards the final exam in order to develop your analytical skills in a mutually supportive and challenging environment

(b) to allow you an opportunity to respond to the issues which arise in lectures on particular courses

NOTE: it is not possible to cover all required texts listed for the core lecture courses

(c) to develop your close reading skills in order to prepare you for the specific part of the end-of-year examinations where these skills will be tested

(d) to develop your understanding of how the six lecture courses link and interact, again in preparation for a specific part of the end-of-year examinations

With these purposes in mind, you may be asked to write short essays in practical criticism. These will help you develop valuable skills and you would be wise to regard them as necessary exercises.


Note: Many English Departments in other institutions have dispensed with tutorial seminars. They are costly in terms of time and money. The Department of English in UCD continues to invest in tutorial seminars because of the important role they play as a touchstone for mutual support, and the development of ideas and skills among our students. Your active involvement in the tutorial seminar is what justifies their continuation.


What is my role in the tutorial seminar?

Your role requires your active involvement:

  1. reading the set texts and completing other necessary preparation work beforehand each week

  2. attending the tutorial seminar each week

  3. in the tutorial seminar, expressing your own ideas and listening to those of others

  4. submitting the short essays which your tutor may assign

(This is work in which you can experiment with ideas and develop your critical skills outside the pressure of the examinations.)

  1. using your tutor’s office hours for individual guidance and feedback



REGULATIONS

The regulations and procedures listed below are set to ensure fairness for all students.


THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

PLEASE CHECK THE NOTICE-BOARDS REGULARLY.


SEMINAR OPTION ESSAY REGULATIONS (ContinuousAssessment)

Department of English


ESSAY LENGTH: 4,000 words (16 pages approximately; double-spaced typing).

Hand-written essays are acceptable with the permission of the seminar leader. Such essays must be legibly written on one side only of each page, on every second line.

SEMINAR MARK: One essay mark + attendance/contribution assessment constitute 12.5% of your overall mark in English (one half of your total C/A mark of 25%).


ESSAY DEADLINES and PENALTIES FOR LATE SUBMISSION:

  • If you cannot submit your work on time, you should contact the relevant Head of Year.

In general, only a appropriate medical certificate or verifiable personal excuse will be an acceptable basis for an extended deadline.


First Semester Seminar Essay:

By 4.30 p.m. Monday, 16th December

10 mark penalty: essays submitted by 4.30 pm, Friday, 20th December

20 mark penalty: essays submitted by 4.30 pm, Monday, 6th January

30 mark penalty: essays submitted by 4.30 pm, Friday, 25th April

50 mark penalty: essays submitted after 25th April


Second Semester Seminar Essay:

By 4.30 pm, Monday, 10th March

10 mark penalty: essays submitted by 4.30 pm, Tuesday, 18th March

20 mark penalty: essays submitted by 4.30 pm, Monday, 24th March

30 mark penalty: essays submitted by 4.30 pm, Friday, 25th April

50 mark penalty: essays submitted after 25th April


Late essays should be submitted to J206 or to the relevant Head of Year to be date-stamped.

Individual seminar leaders will not accept essays.


SEMINAR OPTION ESSAY REGULATIONS

WORKS CITED: All essays should supply a list of works cited, as described in the “Style Sheet” in this Booklet.


COVER SHEETS: You are required to complete a “Cover Sheet” for each essay and submit essays and “Cover Sheets” to J206 to be date-stamped. Please do not submit your essays in plastic covers.


STYLE SHEET: Essays submitted in a form that does not conform to “Style Sheet” issued by the department will be penalised to a maximum of 5 marks.


PLAGIARISM: Plagiarism is the appropriation of material without proper acknowledgement of the source and without clear indication of how much of the source you have used at any one instance (for example, through use of quotation marks). Plagiarism includes the unacknowledged use of any published or broadcast source, internet resources, another student’s work, etc. and will be very heavily penalized.


* Non-attendance penalty: a penalty of ten marks will accrue to the essays of students who have (without adequate reason) missed more than three out of the nine sessions in a seminar course. In general, only a relevant medical certificate or verifiable personal excuse will be an acceptable basis for waiver of this penalty.


EXAMINATIONS:

You are required to sit examinations in April/May 2003.


Mode II students: Four English examinations—two papers will be set for the lecture courses in Modern English; one for the lecture courses in Old and Middle English; and one will assess close-reading and cross-course comparison skills.

The results of these examinations constitute 75% of your total degree mark in English.


The balance of 25% is made up by the continuous assessment mark (C/A). This mark is the sum of your two seminar course results.


ESSAY and EXAMINATION GRADE CATEGORIES:

FIRST CLASS HONOURS: 70% + I

SECOND CLASS HONOURS, GRADE I: 62% to 69% II.1

SECOND CLASS HONOURS, GRADE II: 55% to 61% II.2

THIRD CLASS HONOURS: 50% to 54% III

PASS: 40% to 49% Pass

FAIL: 39% or less Fail


PLEASE CHECK THE NOTICE-BOARDS REGULARLY FOR NOTIFICATION OF CHANGES TO PROCEDURES AND/OR SCHEDULES.


On behalf of the Combined Departments of English, we wish you well for the year ahead:

Dr John Brannigan (K202), Dr Ron Callan (J209), Dr Catriona Clutterbuck (J216), and Dr Margaret Robson (F105)


THIRD YEAR ENGLISH 2002-03

Lecture Schedule

FIRST SEMESTER (Term begins 16 September 2002)

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9

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