This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council




НазваниеThis Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council
страница1/35
Дата07.10.2012
Размер1.36 Mb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   35
Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs


Working Party on Consumer Policy


Information Paper on Consumer Policy Issues


May 2007


This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council.


Disclaimer:


This Information paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council.


Contents








Page

Overview





4

Working Party Terms of Reference


Appendix 1

15

Data on the scope and activities of consumer agencies


Attachment 1

17

The Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs


Attachment 2

30

The contribution of consumer policy to the development of sustainable economic and social goals


Attachment 3

62

The need for governments, businesses and consumers to share responsibility for achieving consumer policy outcomes


Attachment 4

69

The appropriate balance between consumer empowerment and the need to ensure that consumers and businesses are not burdened by unnecessary regulation or complexity when governments intervene in markets


Attachment 5

75

The benefits and challenges from greater national and international trade in consumer products


Attachment 6

81

Enhanced integration between the Australian and New Zealand economies and consumer policy


Attachment 7

87

National consistency and uniformity


Attachment 8

95

The role of consumers and consumer organisations in relation to consumer policy research and advocacy


Attachment 9

101

The need for consumer policy to be based on evidence from the operation of markets, including the behaviour of market participants


Attachment 10

113

The role of industry specific regulation, including codes of conduct, and its relationship to general regulation


Attachment 11

122

Contract formation and unfair contract terms


Attachment 12

128

Institutional arrangements for consumer protection agencies


Attachment 13

135


Overview


The Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs established a Working Party on Consumer Policy in May 2006 to consider the current state of consumer policy and to develop options for improvement. This followed the 2006 National Consumer Congress, which highlighted that improvements are needed in the design and implementation of consumer policy if Australia is to achieve world’s best practice.


The establishment of the Working Party also recognises that consumer policy will be a significant focus of other reform activities being undertaken in Australia, including a Productivity Commission Inquiry, COAG reforms and regulatory burden reduction projects across the country.


In line with its Terms of Reference (appendix 1), the Working Party

has developed a series of information papers that identify and analyse issues relevant to developing options for the reform of Australia’s consumer policy framework. While the papers do not comprehensively analyse all consumer policy issues, they highlight issues that are critical to understanding the current consumer policy environment, particularly the role of consumer policy and to analysing whether consumer agencies, consumers and businesses are maximising their contribution to achieving consumer policy objectives. They are intended to inform the current policy debate rather than draw policy conclusions and do not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council.


To put these papers in context, this overview outlines the regulatory and institutional framework that establishes Australian and New Zealand consumer policy, and summarises key themes that emerge from the papers.


Consumer policy in Australia has not been comprehensively reviewed for some time. In 1976, the Swanson Review1 looked at the operation and effectiveness of the Trade Practices Act 1974 (Cwth) (TPA), including its consumer protection measures. The review supported consumer protection laws that are “administered on a local basis as far as possible”2, but noted the need for greater cooperation among the states and between the states and the Commonwealth. It recommended uniform laws on prohibitions of unfair practices and implied conditions and warranties3. The comments of the Swanson Review were heeded but it was several years before substantive action was taken.


In 1983, a meeting of the Standing Committee of Consumer Affairs Ministers (later renamed the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs) reflected a strong commitment to nationally uniform consumer protection legislation, noting that uniformity was “prima facie desirable.” This view, which seemed to provide the impetus for action, was largely based on the 1982 report of the Victorian Consumer Affairs Council4. The Council’s inquiry into deceptive trade practices was the first to recommend States adopt the whole of Part V of the Commonwealth TPA.


Between 1985 and 1992 each state and territory passed its own Fair Trading Act or equivalent. Each of these Acts borrowed heavily from the consumer provisions in the TPA.


Since these reforms, consumer markets have become broader and more complex. Our understanding of consumer decision making and the problems arising in consumer markets is also more comprehensive, and we are more aware of the impacts of poorly designed and unnecessarily costly regulation.


Arguably, society’s expectations have also changed. The community expects governments to take action to protect consumers against products that could cause significant harm, and to include consumers in policy development and implementation processes. In addition, there is an increasing expectation that businesses will be socially responsible. Accommodating these changes requires new approaches to designing and implementing consumer policy. While consumer policy has adapted, addressing new issues as they arose, it is timely to take stock and consider whether the current framework and use of policy tools represents best practice.

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   35

Похожие:

This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council iconTo the Productivity Commission’s Issues Paper on

This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council iconA position Paper for The World Commission on Forests and Sustainable Development

This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council iconBritish Council Lithuania Information Centre

This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council iconBritish Council Lithuania Information Centre

This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council iconBritish Council Lithuania Information Centre

This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council iconBritish Council Lithuania Information Centre

This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council iconCode: it601 Paper : Information Technology 3 1 4

This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council iconMidterm (March 20) (30%), Term Paper (April 9) (30%) and Final (May 8) (40%). Paper (12 pages maximum) – on major current policy issue facing one of the countries studied. Please submit to ta by email and note class title and number. Readings

This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council iconBiographies of council members

This Information Paper is intended to provide information to the Productivity Commission. The Paper does not represent the policy position of the Ministerial Council on Consumer Affairs or the individual members of the Council iconBiographies of council members

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница